Volatility and return jumps in bitcoin - ScienceDirect

Why we need to think more carefully about what money is and how it works

Most of us have overlooked a fundamental problem that is currently causing an insurmountable obstacle to building a fairer and more sustainable world. We are very familiar with the thing in question, but its problematic nature has been hidden from us by a powerful illusion. We think the problem is capitalism, but capitalism is just the logical outcome of aggregate human decisions about how to manage money. The fundamental problem is money itself, or more specifically general purpose money and the international free market which allows you to sell a chunk of rainforest and use the money to buy a soft drink factory. (You can use the same sort of money to sell anything and buy anything, anywhere in the world, and until recently there was no alternative at all. Bitcoin is now an alternative, but is not quite what we are looking for.) The illusion is that because market prices are free, and nobody is forced into a transaction, those prices must be fair – that the exchange is equitable. The truth is that the way the general money globalised free market system works means that even though the prices are freely determined, there is still an unequal flow of natural resources from poor parts of the world to rich parts. This means the poor parts will always remain poor, and resources will continue to accumulate in the large, unsustainable cities in rich countries. In other words, unless we re-invent money, we cannot overturn capitalism, and that means we can't build a sustainable civilisation.
Why does this matter? What use is it realising that general purpose money is at the root of our problems when we know that the rich and powerful people who run this world will do everything in their power to prevent the existing world system being reformed? They aren't just going to agree to get rid of general purpose money and economic globalisation. It's like asking them to stop pursuing growth: they can't even imagine how to do it, and don't want to. So how does this offer us a way forwards?
Answer: because the two things in question – our monetary system and globalisation – look like being among the first casualties of collapse. Globalisation is already going into reverse (see brexit, Trump's protectionism) and our fiat money system is heading towards a debt/inflation implosion.
It looks highly likely that the scenario going forwards will be of increasing monetary and economic chaos. Fiat money systems have collapsed many times before, but never a global system of fiat currencies floating against each other. But regardless of how may fiat currencies collapse, or how high the price of gold goes in dollars, it is not clear what the system would be replaced with. Can we just go back to the gold standard? It is possible, but people will be desperately looking for other solutions, and the people in power might also be getting desperate.
So what could replace it? What is needed is a new sort of complementary money system which both
(a) addresses the immediate economic problems of people suffering from symptoms of economic and general collapse and
(b) provides a long-term framework around which a new sort of economy can emerge – an economy which is adapted to deglobalisation and degrowth.
I have been searching for answers to this question for some time, and have now found what I was looking for. It is explained in this recently published academic book, and this paper by the same professor of economic anthropology (Alf Hornborg). The answer is the creation of a new sort of money, but it is critically important exactly how this is done. Local currencies like the Bristol Pound do not challenge globalisation. What we need is a new sort of national currency. This currency would be issued as a UBI, but only usable to buy products and services originating within an adjustable radius. This would enable a new economy to emerge. It actually resists globalisation and promotes the growth of a new sort of economy where sustainability is built on local resources and local economic activity. It would also reverse the trend of population moving from poor rural areas and towns, to cities. It would revitalise the “left behind” parts of the western world, and put the brakes on the relentless flow of natural resources and “embodied cheap labour” from the poor parts of the world to the rich parts. It would set the whole system moving towards a more sustainable and fairer state.
This may sound unrealistic, but please give it a chance. I believe it offers a way forwards that can
(a) unite disparate factions trying to provoke systemic change, including eco-marxists, greens, posthumanists and anti-globalist supporters of “populist nationalism”. The only people who really stand to lose are the supporters of global big business and the 1%.
(b) offers a realistic alternative to a money system heading towards collapse, and to which currently no other realistic alternative is being proposed.
In other words, this offers a realistic way forwards not just right now but through much of the early stages of collapse. It is likely to become both politically and economically viable within the forseeable future. It does, though, require some elements of the left to abandon its globalist ideals. It will have to embrace a new sort of nationalism. And it will require various groups who are doing very well out of the current economic system to realise that it is doomed.
Here is an FAQ (from the paper).
What is a complementary currency? It is a form of money that can be used alongside regular money.
What is the fundamental goal of this proposal? The two most fundamental goals motivating this proposal are to insulate local human subsistence and livelihood from the vicissitudes of national and international economic cycles and financial speculation, and to provide tangible and attractive incentives for people to live and consume more sustainably. It also seeks to provide authorities with a means to employ social security expenditures to channel consumption in sustainable directions and encourage economic diversity and community resilience at the local level.
Why should the state administrate the reform? The nation is currently the most encompassing political entity capable of administrating an economic reform of this nature. Ideally it is also subservient to the democratic decisions of its population. The current proposal is envisaged as an option for European nations, but would seem equally advantageous for countries anywhere. If successfully implemented within a particular nation or set of nations, the system can be expected to be emulated by others. Whereas earlier experiments with alternative currencies have generally been local, bottom-up initiatives, a state-supported program offers advantages for long-term success. Rather than an informal, marginal movement connected to particular identities and transient social networks, persisting only as long as the enthusiasm of its founders, the complementary currency advocated here is formalized, efficacious, and lastingly fundamental to everyone's economy.
How is local use defined and monitored? The complementary currency (CC) can only be used to purchase goods and services that are produced within a given geographical radius of the point of purchase. This radius can be defined in terms of kilometers of transport, and it can vary between different nations and regions depending on circumstances. A fairly simple way of distinguishing local from non-local commodities would be to label them according to transport distance, much as is currently done regarding, for instance, organic production methods or "fair trade." Such transport certification would of course imply different labelling in different locales.
How is the complementary currency distributed? A practical way of organizing distribution would be to provide each citizen with a plastic card which is electronically charged each month with the sum of CC allotted to him or her.
Who are included in the category of citizens? A monthly CC is provided to all inhabitants of a nation who have received official residence permits.
What does basic income mean? Basic income is distributed without any requirements or duties to be fulfilled by the recipients. The sum of CC paid to an individual each month can be determined in relation to the currency's purchasing power and to the individual's age. The guiding principle should be that the sum provided to each adult should be sufficient to enable basic existence, and that the sum provided for each child should correspond to the additional household expenses it represents.
Why would people want to use their CC rather than regular money? As the sum of CC provided each month would correspond to purchases representing a claim on his or her regular budget, the basic income would liberate a part of each person's regular income and thus amount to substantial purchasing power, albeit restricted only to local purchases. The basic income in CC would reduce a person's dependence on wage labor and the risks currently associated with unemployment. It would encourage social cooperation and a vitalization of community.
Why would businesses want to accept payment in CC? Business entrepreneurs can be expected to respond rapidly to the radically expanded demand for local products and services, which would provide opportunities for a diverse range of local niche markets. Whether they receive all or only a part of their income in the form of CC, they can choose to use some of it to purchase tax-free local labor or other inputs, and to request to have some of it converted by the authorities to regular currency (see next point).
How is conversion of CC into regular currency organized? Entrepreneurs would be granted the right to convert some of their CC into regular currency at exchange rates set by the authorities.The exchange rate between the two currencies can be calibrated so as to compensate the authorities for loss of tax revenue and to balance the in- and outflows of CC to the state. The rate would thus amount to a tool for determining the extent to which the CC is recirculated in the local economy, or returned to the state. This is important in order to avoid inflation in the CC sector.
Would there be interest on sums of CC owned or loaned? There would be no interest accruing on a sum of CC, whether a surplus accumulating in an account or a loan extended.
How would saving and loaning of CC be organized? The formal granting of credit in CC would be managed by state authorities and follow the principle of full reserve banking, so that quantities of CC loaned would never exceed the quantities saved by the population as a whole.
Would the circulation of CC be subjected to taxation? No.
Why would authorities want to encourage tax-free local economies? Given the beneficial social and ecological consequences of this reform, it is assumed that nation states will represent the general interests of their electorates and thus promote it. Particularly in a situation with rising fiscal deficits, unemployment, health care, and social security expenditures, the proposed reform would alleviate financial pressure on governments. It would also reduce the rising costs of transport infrastructure, environmental protection, carbon offsetting, and climate change adaptation. In short, the rising costs and diminishing returns on current strategies for economic growth can be expected to encourage politicians to consider proposals such as this, as a means of avoiding escalating debt or even bankruptcy.
How would the state's expenditures in CC be financed? As suggested above, much of these expenditures would be balanced by the reduced costs for social security, health care, transport infrastructure, environmental protection, carbon offsetting, and climate change adaptation. As these savings may take time to materialize, however, states can choose to make a proportion of their social security payments (pensions, unemployment insurance, family allowance, etc.) in the form of CC. As between a third and half of some nations' annual budgets are committed to social security, this represents a significant option for financing the reform, requiring no corresponding tax levies.
What are the differences between this CC and the many experiments with local currencies? This proposal should not be confused with the notion, or with the practical operation, of local currencies, as it does not imply different currencies in different locales but one national,complementary currency for local use. Nor is it locally initiated and promoted in opposition to theregular currency, but centrally endorsed and administrated as an accepted complement to it. Most importantly, the alternative currency can only be used to purchase products and services originating from within a given geographical range, a restriction which is not implemented in experiments with Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS). Finally, the CC is provided as a basic income to all residents of a nation, rather than only earned in proportion to the extent to which a person has made him- or herself useful in the local economy.
What would the ecological benefits be? The reform would radically reduce the demand for long-distance transport, the production of greenhouse gas emissions, consumption of energy and materials, and losses of foodstuffs through overproduction, storage, and transport. It would increase recycling of nutrients and packaging materials, which means decreasing leakage of nutrients and less garbage. It would reduce agricultural intensification, increase biodiversity, and decrease ecological degradation and vulnerability.
What would the societal benefits be? The reform would increase local cooperation, decrease social marginalization and addiction problems, provide more physical exercise, improve psycho-social and physical health, and increase food security and general community resilience. It would decrease the number of traffic accidents, provide fresher and healthier food with less preservatives, and improved contact between producers and consumers.
What would the long-term consequences be for the economy? The reform would no doubt generate radical transformations of the economy, as is precisely the intention. There would be a significant shift of dominance from transnational corporations founded on financial speculation and trade in industrially produced foodstuffs, fuels, and other internationally transported goods to locally diverse producers and services geared to sustainable livelihoods. This would be a democratic consequence of consumer power, rather than of legislation. Through a relatively simple transformation of the conditions for market rationality, governments can encourage new and more sustainable patterns of consumer behavior. In contrast to much of the drastic and often traumatic economic change of the past two centuries, these changes would be democratic and sustainable and would improve local and national resilience.
Why should society want to encourage people to refrain from formal employment? It is increasingly recognized that full or high employment cannot be a goal in itself, particularly if it implies escalating environmental degradation and energy and material throughput. Well-founded calls are thus currently made for degrowth, i.e. a reduction in the rate of production of goods and services that are conventionally quantified by economists as constitutive of GDP. Whether formal unemployment is the result of financial decline, technological development, or intentional policy for sustainability, no modern nation can be expected to leave its citizens economically unsupported. To subsist on basic income is undoubtedly more edifying than receiving unemployment insurance; the CC system encourages useful community cooperation and creative activities rather than destructive behavior that may damage a person's health.
Why should people receive an income without working? As observed above, modern nations will provide for their citizens whether they are formally employed or not. The incentive to find employment should ideally not be propelled only by economic imperatives, but more by the desire to maintain a given identity and to contribute creatively to society. Personal liberty would be enhanced by a reform which makes it possible for people to choose to spend (some of) their time on creative activities that are not remunerated on the formal market, and to accept the tradeoff implied by a somewhat lower economic standard. People can also be expected to devote a greater proportion of their time to community cooperation, earning additional CC, which means that they will contribute more to society – and experience less marginalization – than the currently unemployed.
Would savings in CC be inheritable? No.
How would transport distances of products and services be controlled? It is reasonable to expect the authorities to establish a special agency for monitoring and controlling transport distances. It seems unlikely that entrepreneurs would attempt to cheat the system by presenting distantly produced goods as locally produced, as we can expect income in regular currency generally to be preferable to income in CC. Such attempts would also entail transport costs which should make the cargo less competitive in relation to genuinely local produce, suggesting that the logic of local market mechanisms would by and large obviate the problem.
How would differences in local conditions (such as climate, soils, and urbanism) be dealt with?It is unavoidable that there would be significant variation between different locales in terms of the conditions for producing different kinds of goods. This means that relative local prices in CC for agiven product can be expected to vary from place to place. This may in turn mean that consumption patterns will vary somewhat between locales, which is predictable and not necessarily a problem. Generally speaking, a localization of resource flows can be expected to result in a more diverse pattern of calibration to local resource endowments, as in premodern contexts. The proposed system allows for considerable flexibility in terms of the geographical definition of what is categorized as local, depending on such conditions. In a fertile agricultural region, the radius for local produce may be defined, for instance, as 20 km, whereas in a less fertile or urban area, it may be 50 km. People living in urban centers are faced with a particular challenge. The reform would encourage an increased production of foodstuffs within and in the vicinity of urban areas, which in the long run may also affect urban planning. People might also choose to move to the countryside, where the range of subsistence goods that can be purchased with CC will tend to be greater. In the long run, the reform can be expected to encourage a better fit between the distribution of resources (such as agricultural land) and demography. This is fully in line with the intention of reducing long-distance transports of necessities.
What would the consequences be if people converted resources from one currency sphere into products or services sold in another? It seems unfeasible to monitor and regulate the use of distant imports (such as machinery and fuels) in producing produce for local markets, but as production for local markets is remunerated in CC, this should constitute a disincentive to invest regular money in such production processes. Production for local consumption can thus be expected to rely mostly – and increasingly – on local labor and other resource inputs.

submitted by anthropoz to sustainability [link] [comments]

A realistic way forwards (long, but I believe important)

Most of us have overlooked a fundamental problem that is currently causing an insurmountable obstacle to building a fairer and more sustainable world. We are very familiar with the thing in question, but its problematic nature has been hidden from us by a powerful illusion. We think the problem is capitalism, but capitalism is just the logical outcome of aggregate human decisions about how to manage money. The fundamental problem is money itself, or more specifically general purpose money and the international free market which allows you to sell a chunk of rainforest and use the money to buy a soft drink factory. (You can use the same sort of money to sell anything and buy anything, anywhere in the world, and until recently there was no alternative at all. Bitcoin is now an alternative, but is not quite what we are looking for.) The illusion is that because market prices are free, and nobody is forced into a transaction, those prices must be fair – that the exchange is equitable. The truth is that the way the general money globalised free market system works means that even though the prices are freely determined, there is still an unequal flow of natural resources from poor parts of the world to rich parts. This means the poor parts will always remain poor, and resources will continue to accumulate in the large, unsustainable cities in rich countries. In other words, unless we re-invent money, we cannot overturn capitalism, and that means we can't build a sustainable civilisation.
Why does this matter? What use is it realising that general purpose money is at the root of our problems when we know that the rich and powerful people who run this world will do everything in their power to prevent the existing world system being reformed? They aren't just going to agree to get rid of general purpose money and economic globalisation. It's like asking them to stop pursuing growth: they can't even imagine how to do it, and don't want to. So how does this offer us a way forwards?
Answer: because the two things in question – our monetary system and globalisation – look like being among the first casualties of collapse. Globalisation is already going into reverse (see brexit, Trump's protectionism) and our fiat money system is heading towards a debt/inflation implosion.
It looks highly likely that the scenario going forwards will be of increasing monetary and economic chaos. Fiat money systems have collapsed many times before, but never a global system of fiat currencies floating against each other. But regardless of how may fiat currencies collapse, or how high the price of gold goes in dollars, it is not clear what the system would be replaced with. Can we just go back to the gold standard? It is possible, but people will be desperately looking for other solutions, and the people in power might also be getting desperate.
So what could replace it? What is needed is a new sort of complementary money system which both
(a) addresses the immediate economic problems of people suffering from symptoms of economic and general collapse and
(b) provides a long-term framework around which a new sort of economy can emerge – an economy which is adapted to deglobalisation and degrowth.
I have been searching for answers to this question for some time, and have now found what I was looking for. It is explained in this recently published academic book, and this paper by the same professor of economic anthropology (Alf Hornborg). The answer is the creation of a new sort of money, but it is critically important exactly how this is done. Local currencies like the Bristol Pound do not challenge globalisation. What we need is a new sort of national currency. This currency would be issued as a UBI, but only usable to buy products and services originating within an adjustable radius. This would enable a new economy to emerge. It actually resists globalisation and promotes the growth of a new sort of economy where sustainability is built on local resources and local economic activity. It would also reverse the trend of population moving from poor rural areas and towns, to cities. It would revitalise the “left behind” parts of the western world, and put the brakes on the relentless flow of natural resources and “embodied cheap labour” from the poor parts of the world to the rich parts. It would set the whole system moving towards a more sustainable and fairer state.
This may sound unrealistic, but please give it a chance. I believe it offers a way forwards that can
(a) unite disparate factions trying to provoke systemic change, including eco-marxists, greens, posthumanists and anti-globalist supporters of “populist nationalism”, as well as large numbers of confused and worried "ordinary" people. The only people who really stand to lose are the supporters of global big business and the 1%.
(b) offers a realistic alternative to a money system heading towards collapse, and to which currently no other realistic alternative is being proposed.
In other words, this offers a realistic way forwards not just right now but through much of the early stages of collapse. It is likely to become both politically and economically viable within the forseeable future. It does, though, require some elements of the left to abandon its globalist ideals. It will have to embrace a new sort of nationalism. And it will require various groups who are doing very well out of the current economic system to realise that it is doomed.
Here is an FAQ (from the paper).
What is a complementary currency? It is a form of money that can be used alongside regular money.
What is the fundamental goal of this proposal? The two most fundamental goals motivating this proposal are to insulate local human subsistence and livelihood from the vicissitudes of national and international economic cycles and financial speculation, and to provide tangible and attractive incentives for people to live and consume more sustainably. It also seeks to provide authorities with a means to employ social security expenditures to channel consumption in sustainable directions and encourage economic diversity and community resilience at the local level.
Why should the state administrate the reform? The nation is currently the most encompassing political entity capable of administrating an economic reform of this nature. Ideally it is also subservient to the democratic decisions of its population. The current proposal is envisaged as an option for European nations, but would seem equally advantageous for countries anywhere. If successfully implemented within a particular nation or set of nations, the system can be expected to be emulated by others. Whereas earlier experiments with alternative currencies have generally been local, bottom-up initiatives, a state-supported program offers advantages for long-term success. Rather than an informal, marginal movement connected to particular identities and transient social networks, persisting only as long as the enthusiasm of its founders, the complementary currency advocated here is formalized, efficacious, and lastingly fundamental to everyone's economy.
How is local use defined and monitored? The complementary currency (CC) can only be used to purchase goods and services that are produced within a given geographical radius of the point of purchase. This radius can be defined in terms of kilometers of transport, and it can vary between different nations and regions depending on circumstances. A fairly simple way of distinguishing local from non-local commodities would be to label them according to transport distance, much as is currently done regarding, for instance, organic production methods or "fair trade." Such transport certification would of course imply different labelling in different locales.
How is the complementary currency distributed? A practical way of organizing distribution would be to provide each citizen with a plastic card which is electronically charged each month with the sum of CC allotted to him or her.
Who are included in the category of citizens? A monthly CC is provided to all inhabitants of a nation who have received official residence permits.
What does basic income mean? Basic income is distributed without any requirements or duties to be fulfilled by the recipients. The sum of CC paid to an individual each month can be determined in relation to the currency's purchasing power and to the individual's age. The guiding principle should be that the sum provided to each adult should be sufficient to enable basic existence, and that the sum provided for each child should correspond to the additional household expenses it represents.
Why would people want to use their CC rather than regular money? As the sum of CC provided each month would correspond to purchases representing a claim on his or her regular budget, the basic income would liberate a part of each person's regular income and thus amount to substantial purchasing power, albeit restricted only to local purchases. The basic income in CC would reduce a person's dependence on wage labor and the risks currently associated with unemployment. It would encourage social cooperation and a vitalization of community.
Why would businesses want to accept payment in CC? Business entrepreneurs can be expected to respond rapidly to the radically expanded demand for local products and services, which would provide opportunities for a diverse range of local niche markets. Whether they receive all or only a part of their income in the form of CC, they can choose to use some of it to purchase tax-free local labor or other inputs, and to request to have some of it converted by the authorities to regular currency (see next point).
How is conversion of CC into regular currency organized? Entrepreneurs would be granted the right to convert some of their CC into regular currency at exchange rates set by the authorities.The exchange rate between the two currencies can be calibrated so as to compensate the authorities for loss of tax revenue and to balance the in- and outflows of CC to the state. The rate would thus amount to a tool for determining the extent to which the CC is recirculated in the local economy, or returned to the state. This is important in order to avoid inflation in the CC sector.
Would there be interest on sums of CC owned or loaned? There would be no interest accruing on a sum of CC, whether a surplus accumulating in an account or a loan extended.
How would saving and loaning of CC be organized? The formal granting of credit in CC would be managed by state authorities and follow the principle of full reserve banking, so that quantities of CC loaned would never exceed the quantities saved by the population as a whole.
Would the circulation of CC be subjected to taxation? No.
Why would authorities want to encourage tax-free local economies? Given the beneficial social and ecological consequences of this reform, it is assumed that nation states will represent the general interests of their electorates and thus promote it. Particularly in a situation with rising fiscal deficits, unemployment, health care, and social security expenditures, the proposed reform would alleviate financial pressure on governments. It would also reduce the rising costs of transport infrastructure, environmental protection, carbon offsetting, and climate change adaptation. In short, the rising costs and diminishing returns on current strategies for economic growth can be expected to encourage politicians to consider proposals such as this, as a means of avoiding escalating debt or even bankruptcy.
How would the state's expenditures in CC be financed? As suggested above, much of these expenditures would be balanced by the reduced costs for social security, health care, transport infrastructure, environmental protection, carbon offsetting, and climate change adaptation. As these savings may take time to materialize, however, states can choose to make a proportion of their social security payments (pensions, unemployment insurance, family allowance, etc.) in the form of CC. As between a third and half of some nations' annual budgets are committed to social security, this represents a significant option for financing the reform, requiring no corresponding tax levies.
What are the differences between this CC and the many experiments with local currencies? This proposal should not be confused with the notion, or with the practical operation, of local currencies, as it does not imply different currencies in different locales but one national,complementary currency for local use. Nor is it locally initiated and promoted in opposition to theregular currency, but centrally endorsed and administrated as an accepted complement to it. Most importantly, the alternative currency can only be used to purchase products and services originating from within a given geographical range, a restriction which is not implemented in experiments with Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS). Finally, the CC is provided as a basic income to all residents of a nation, rather than only earned in proportion to the extent to which a person has made him- or herself useful in the local economy.
What would the ecological benefits be? The reform would radically reduce the demand for long-distance transport, the production of greenhouse gas emissions, consumption of energy and materials, and losses of foodstuffs through overproduction, storage, and transport. It would increase recycling of nutrients and packaging materials, which means decreasing leakage of nutrients and less garbage. It would reduce agricultural intensification, increase biodiversity, and decrease ecological degradation and vulnerability.
What would the societal benefits be? The reform would increase local cooperation, decrease social marginalization and addiction problems, provide more physical exercise, improve psycho-social and physical health, and increase food security and general community resilience. It would decrease the number of traffic accidents, provide fresher and healthier food with less preservatives, and improved contact between producers and consumers.
What would the long-term consequences be for the economy? The reform would no doubt generate radical transformations of the economy, as is precisely the intention. There would be a significant shift of dominance from transnational corporations founded on financial speculation and trade in industrially produced foodstuffs, fuels, and other internationally transported goods to locally diverse producers and services geared to sustainable livelihoods. This would be a democratic consequence of consumer power, rather than of legislation. Through a relatively simple transformation of the conditions for market rationality, governments can encourage new and more sustainable patterns of consumer behavior. In contrast to much of the drastic and often traumatic economic change of the past two centuries, these changes would be democratic and sustainable and would improve local and national resilience.
Why should society want to encourage people to refrain from formal employment? It is increasingly recognized that full or high employment cannot be a goal in itself, particularly if it implies escalating environmental degradation and energy and material throughput. Well-founded calls are thus currently made for degrowth, i.e. a reduction in the rate of production of goods and services that are conventionally quantified by economists as constitutive of GDP. Whether formal unemployment is the result of financial decline, technological development, or intentional policy for sustainability, no modern nation can be expected to leave its citizens economically unsupported. To subsist on basic income is undoubtedly more edifying than receiving unemployment insurance; the CC system encourages useful community cooperation and creative activities rather than destructive behavior that may damage a person's health.
Why should people receive an income without working? As observed above, modern nations will provide for their citizens whether they are formally employed or not. The incentive to find employment should ideally not be propelled only by economic imperatives, but more by the desire to maintain a given identity and to contribute creatively to society. Personal liberty would be enhanced by a reform which makes it possible for people to choose to spend (some of) their time on creative activities that are not remunerated on the formal market, and to accept the tradeoff implied by a somewhat lower economic standard. People can also be expected to devote a greater proportion of their time to community cooperation, earning additional CC, which means that they will contribute more to society – and experience less marginalization – than the currently unemployed.
Would savings in CC be inheritable? No.
How would transport distances of products and services be controlled? It is reasonable to expect the authorities to establish a special agency for monitoring and controlling transport distances. It seems unlikely that entrepreneurs would attempt to cheat the system by presenting distantly produced goods as locally produced, as we can expect income in regular currency generally to be preferable to income in CC. Such attempts would also entail transport costs which should make the cargo less competitive in relation to genuinely local produce, suggesting that the logic of local market mechanisms would by and large obviate the problem.
How would differences in local conditions (such as climate, soils, and urbanism) be dealt with? It is unavoidable that there would be significant variation between different locales in terms of the conditions for producing different kinds of goods. This means that relative local prices in CC for agiven product can be expected to vary from place to place. This may in turn mean that consumption patterns will vary somewhat between locales, which is predictable and not necessarily a problem. Generally speaking, a localization of resource flows can be expected to result in a more diverse pattern of calibration to local resource endowments, as in premodern contexts. The proposed system allows for considerable flexibility in terms of the geographical definition of what is categorized as local, depending on such conditions. In a fertile agricultural region, the radius for local produce may be defined, for instance, as 20 km, whereas in a less fertile or urban area, it may be 50 km. People living in urban centers are faced with a particular challenge. The reform would encourage an increased production of foodstuffs within and in the vicinity of urban areas, which in the long run may also affect urban planning. People might also choose to move to the countryside, where the range of subsistence goods that can be purchased with CC will tend to be greater. In the long run, the reform can be expected to encourage a better fit between the distribution of resources (such as agricultural land) and demography. This is fully in line with the intention of reducing long-distance transports of necessities.
What would the consequences be if people converted resources from one currency sphere into products or services sold in another? It seems unfeasible to monitor and regulate the use of distant imports (such as machinery and fuels) in producing produce for local markets, but as production for local markets is remunerated in CC, this should constitute a disincentive to invest regular money in such production processes. Production for local consumption can thus be expected to rely mostly – and increasingly – on local labor and other resource inputs.
submitted by anthropoz to ExtinctionRebellion [link] [comments]

A Market Liquidity Theory of the Current Financial Crisis

Huge update from the Fed this morning: https://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/pressreleases/monetary20200323b.htm
I'm not going to have a chance to look through this in detail this morning, but it looks like the Fed might be engaging in a massive loan program and taking just about anything as collateral.
This is going to be a long post and analysis that I have written as much to get my thoughts in order as much to post on here for any feedback or criticism.
Essentially, like many on here, I do not believe that the current situation is a temporary down-turn, but a full blown financial crisis. We have already been hit with the initial shock of this crisis, so the question becomes: what comes next? Helping us understand what is fundamentally happening in the market will aid in making intelligent future predictions and investments. That leads to the question: what exactly is happening in the market right now? What caused us to suddenly drive off a cliff? And is there any way we can save it? Unlikely many here, I do not believe that COVID-19 is the actual underlying crisis. In my opinion, our economy was basically the end stages of a Jenga game, and COVID-19 is just the swift breeze knocking the whole thing over.
As I started looking for the next big market move, I started to wonder who was going to feel the most pain in these markets. Some reading led me to the thought that what we were seeing in the markets was a liquidity issue, and that companies with poor credit ratings will be most affected. I posted about this a couple of days ago, and several others came to the same conclusion as me. 1 2 3. There are other obliviously other problems in the market at the moment, but this analysis will focus on this problem in particular.
I now strongly believe that this hypothesis was correct, even if my initial reasoning and analysis was flawed. I outline a theory, followed by some supporting evidence, and finally some speculation. Finally, I don't think the Fed understands the actual problem the market is facing right now, nor does it have the tools to deal with it.
There are three prerequisites here: repos, collateral transformation, and rehypothecated collateral
Variation-Separate has already written an excellent technical analysis, and explains repos in part I. I will assume you have already read that section. 2
The basic idea behind collateral transforms is this: Your company needs some short-term liquid cash. In order for someone to give you this cash, you need collateral. You only have risky assets (such as junk bonds), but no one will accept them as collateral precisely because they are risky. Everyone in the market wants a secure asset (such as a Treasury). Instead of giving up, you go out and find someone who will loan you their Treasury and accept your junk bonds as collateral. You then use that Treasury to obtain the cash you need. This process can be repeated among many parties in order to create a "collateral chain".
Finally, we have rehypothecated collateral: Someone comes to you and wants to borrow an assets for a short period of time (such as a stock). They give you another asset (such as cash) as collateral in exchange for the stock. You know the borrower won't be back to collect this collateral for a while, so you invest that collateral to make money off of it in the meantime.
As Variation-Separate explains, there have been problems in the repo market recently, and the Fed has acted as the believe appropriate. However, this is not the first time the Fed has run into this problem . In fact, we had a problem a problem in the repo market just in Sept 2019 and "Not only did the spike in the repo rate come as a surprise to the New York Fed, but they also haven't been able to normalize it as quickly as they thought they could". Finally, let's consider that even though the fed has offered to pump massive amounts of liquidity into the market, banks aren't taking it and are quickly repaying that which they do take.
What exactly is going on then? The Fed tries to pump liquidity into the economy, and nothing happens. The reason for this is that the Fed knows that it doesn't understand the underlying problem in the market, and knows that is powerless to stop it. The Fed is trying to unleash every tool in its toolbox on the hope that if it just throws enough money into the market, eventually the problem will go away.
So what is the root problem? Essentially, liquidity. More specifically, collateral transformations and rehypothecated collateral. In fact, this has been written about extensively: 4 5, with Snider in particular making a strong case that today's crisis fits the analysis of the collateral markets that he provided in 2018: 6
How are collateral transformations and rehypothecated collateral affecting liquidity in the markets? There are numerous ways, but let's start with 2:
Let's say someone gives you cash as collateral, and you rehypothecate it as described in the example. However, instead of putting the cash in a safe asset, knowing you have to repay it, you put it in a very risky, high-yield asset such as a junk bond or MBS. Things go wrong, you lose your money and can't pay back your end of the repo. This is exactly what AIG did during the 2008 crisis. 7
Now let's say you engage in a long chain of collateral transformations. You start with a really risk assets, trade that for a sligtly less risky asset, trade that for a moderately risky asset, etc, until you eventually get a pristine asset. Now anyone along that chain can rehypothecate their collateral into some risky investment, causing a huge number of problems. Not to mention that if you, for some reason, can't fulfill your end of the repo, you screw a whole chain of people who have traded with you.
Now, if we are in a strong market, these problems won't arise too often. But what happens if, say, a virus comes out of now where causing wide-spread economic disruptions? Now, maybe those risky investments that would have paid out more often than not aren't pay out at all, causing systemic problems.
Now let's add a couple of things that exacerbate this problem even further:
These chains get so complicated that no one even knows who owns which assets anymore 4
When these chains collateral transformations start to fail, people may become less willing to take the risk of engaging in them 5
All of this caused heavy regulation on the exchange of collateral by primary lenders after the 2008 crisis. This has pushed these transactions into dark markets where we don't really understand what is going on. Here is my hypothesis, heavily taken from Snider's analysis:
Corporations have become heavily reliant on short-term lending for liquidity. However, most of them don't have pristine assets to exchange for cash, or DisneyBucks to float them through hard times. So what to do? You engage in collateral transformations: keep exchanging your junk assets until you get the pristine assets you need to get liquid cash. A bunch of corporations do this over and over again, and eventually they really don't have a clear of idea of what assets they really own.
Further, in these collateral chains they are rehypothecating collateral to make a quick buck. All is well, until this virus comes along. Suddenly, corporations are losing their collateral in these risky investments. Further, they need cash. The first thing they do is try to transform their collateral for short term liquidity. However, a bunch of people have just lost their money playing this game and don't want to play anymore, so it becomes more difficult and expensive for the companies to engage in these collateral transformations. The assets they have are worth less, so they have to sell other assets to compensate. However, everyone is doing this at the same time, devaluing the assets. Devaluation of assets makes it even more expensive to engage in collateral exchanges, and the cycle continues. Finally, when these companies take account of their actual assets, after all of these complicated exchanges, they realize they don't actually own what they think they own, creating additional panic when they are already in crisis mode. This causes huge turmoil, and the markets fall off a cliff.
If this theory is correct, what will we see next? Whether the markets will go up or down is dependent on too many factors to predict. However, I do have some speculation. First let's categorize corporations as follows:
Type I: Safe
Large banking institutions
Large P-1/A-1/F1+ Companies
Companies with huge cash reserves
Type II: Possibly Safe
Small businesses
"Essential" business (i.e., Boeing)
Type III: Doomed
Business with >500 employees, no large cash reserves, not P-1/A-1/F1+
The self-employed
Type I businesses will certainly weather the storm. If they don't have the direct support of the Fed, they have large cash reserves on hand. If they don't have large cash reserves on hand, they have the credit rating to make use of corporate paper. They can find the short term funding needed to make it through this.
Type II businesses may be safe depending on the government response. I am currently underwhelmed by the "support" for small business in the stimulus bill, but there seems to at least be talk about this so maybe things will change. "Essential" businesses may receive a bailout to get them through tough times.
Type III businesses are completely screwed, no one seems to know they are even there. They won't qualify for support as "small businesses", and they have no way of obtaining liquid assets in this market. In particular, the larger businesses don't have the pristine assets to obtain liquidity in these markets, they are dependent on collateral transforms.
I won't predict whether the markets will go up or down this week, next, etc. But I will speculate this: I think the calm we saw in the markets was an actual calm. I think there was panic as businesses tried to obtain liquidity. They now believe they have the liquidity to make it through the near future, and are satisfied. There could be fire-sales in the near term for other reasons, but I don't think short-term liquidity will be the cause. However, most corporations don't speculate very hard when it comes to the future: they listen to the "experts". And these "experts" in government and the financials have been predicting doom and gloom for the next couple weeks, but that things will "bounce back" afterward. This is flatly false. As this becomes more apparent to these companies, I think we'll see another run on the market.
Particularly, it will be the large Type III business that will be the most vulnerable. They won't have any government stimulus support, and they won't have access to their normal modes of obtain cash. The last panic in the markets pushed bond yields so high that issuing new bonds will be completely out of the question. For them, it will be like a game of chess where your 4 moves away from being mated no matter what you do. Many of them will decide that bankruptcy is the best option in front of them.
Can the Fed prevent this? I don't think so. The Fed has the ability to soak up P-1/A-1/F1+, but they can only do this through the banks. But the banks aren't the ones in trouble this time, its the market itself. I have not read anything that leads me to believe that the Fed would be able to purchase junk assets from non- P-1/A-1/F1+ corporations without an act of Congress, and Congress is too slow and incompetent to see this problem coming or fix it in time. The Colosseum will be protected as Rome burns around it.
Sorry for any typos, poor wording. This was a long post.
submitted by the_asker_man to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

EDIT: Per the moderation staff, I'm adding in to the header what I'm using to make it easier for prospective miners.
  1. Go to https://www.nicehash.com/
  2. Create a login
  3. Download their software and run it (this used to be "????")
  4. Profit
Once you reach 0.002 BTC (about 7-10 days on my GTX 1060 + i7-7700k), you can transfer your earnings to Coinbase for free, and cash out. CB does have fees for conversion to Fiat (cash) and your percentage goes down with higher amounts. So don't cash out just because you can. Cash out when you have enough to buy something.
Also a note on taxes. I'm going to keep this simple.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading. Bear with me as I go over this a few more times for typing/grammar. And I look forward to your comments.
submitted by jaykresge to hardware [link] [comments]

The Internal Revenue Service Takes A Position On Bitcoin


Bitcoin utilized to be something like Schrodinger's currency. Without regulative observers, it might declare to be cash and residential or commercial property at the very same time.
Now the Irs has actually opened package, and the virtual currency's condition is developed - a minimum of for federal tax functions.
The Internal Revenue Service just recently provided assistance on how it will deal with bitcoin, and any other stateless electronic rival. The brief response: as residential or commercial property, not currency. Bitcoin, in addition to other virtual currencies that can be exchanged for legal tender, will now be dealt with most of the times as a capital possession, and in a couple of scenarios as stock. Bitcoin holders who are not dealerships will go through capital gains tax on boosts in worth. Bitcoin "miners," who open the currency's algorithms, will require to report their finds as earnings, simply as other miners do when drawing out more standard resources.
Though this choice is not likely to trigger much turbulence, it deserves keeping in mind. Now that the Internal Revenue Service has actually phoned, financiers and bitcoin lovers can move on with a more precise understanding of what they are (practically) holding. A bitcoin holder who wishes to abide by the tax law, instead of avert it, now understands how to do so.
I believe the Internal Revenue Service is appropriate in identifying that bitcoin is not cash. Bitcoin, and other virtual currencies like it, is too unsteady in worth for it to reasonably be called a type of currency. In this period of drifting crypto exchanges rate, it holds true that the worth of almost all currencies modifications from week to week or year to year relative to any specific standard, whether it's the dollar or a barrel of oil. However an essential function of cash is to function as a shop of worth. The worth of the cash itself ought to not alter dramatically from day to day or hour to hour.
Bitcoin absolutely fails this test. Purchasing a bitcoin is a speculative financial investment. It is not a location to park your idle, spendable money. Even more, to my understanding, no mainstream banks will pay interest on bitcoin deposits in the type of more bitcoins. Any return on a bitcoin holding comes entirely from a modification in the bitcoin's worth.
Whether the Internal Revenue Service' choice will assist or harm present bitcoin holders depends upon why they desired bitcoins in the very first location. For those wishing to benefit straight from bitcoin's variations in worth, this is great news, as the guidelines for capital gains and losses are fairly beneficial to taxpayers. This characterization likewise supports the method some prominent bitcoin lovers, consisting of the Winklevoss twins, have actually reported their incomes in the lack of clear assistance. (While the brand-new treatment of bitcoin applies to previous years, charge relief might be offered to taxpayers who can show sensible cause for their positions.).

For those wishing to utilize bitcoin to pay their lease or purchase coffee, the choice includes intricacy, given that costs bitcoin is dealt with as a taxable type of barter. Those who invest bitcoins, and those who accept them as payment, will both require to keep in mind the reasonable market price of the bitcoin on the date the deal takes place. This will be utilized to determine the spender's capital gains or losses and the receiver's basis for future gains or losses.

While the activating occasion - the deal - is simple to determine, figuring out a specific bitcoin's basis, or its holding duration in order to identify whether short-term or long-lasting capital gains tax rates use, might show tough. For a financier, that may be an appropriate trouble. However when you are choosing whether to purchase your latte with a bitcoin or simply pull 5 dollars out of your wallet, the simpleness of the latter is most likely to win the day. The Internal Revenue Service assistance merely explains what was currently real: Bitcoin isn't a brand-new type of money. Its advantages and disadvantages are various.
The Internal Revenue Service has actually likewise clarified a number of other points. If a company pays an employee in virtual currency, that payment counts as earnings for work tax functions. And if services pay worth $600 or more to independent specialists utilizing bitcoin, business will be needed to submit Types 1099, simply as they would if they paid the professionals in money.
Clearer guidelines might trigger brand-new administrative headaches for some bitcoin users, however they might make sure bitcoin's future at a time when financiers have great factor to be careful." [Bitcoin is] getting authenticity, which it didn't have formerly," Ajay Vinze, the associate dean at Arizona State University's service school, informed The New york city Times. He stated the Internal Revenue Service choice "puts Bitcoin on a track to ending up being a real monetary possession.".
When all bitcoin users can acknowledge and settle on the kind of property it is, that result is likelier.
A minority of bitcoin users saw its previous uncontrolled status as a function, not a downside. A few of them oppose federal government oversight for ideological factors, while others discovered bitcoin a helpful method to carry out illegal company. However as the current collapse of popular bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox showed, uncontrolled bitcoin exchange can cause devastating losses without any safeguard. Some users might have believed they were securing themselves by getting away to bitcoin to leave the greatly regulated banking market, however no policy at all isn't the response either.
The Internal Revenue Service is proper when it states that bitcoin must be dealt with as home. This certainty might protect the future of a property that, while it makes bad currency, may be helpful to those who wish to hold it as home for speculative or industrial factors.
submitted by Aaliyah4563 to Bitcoinshow [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

This is a crosspost from /hardware, but I will be editing this independently based on community feedback and guidelines. Prior to posting here, I reached out to your local mod staff to ensure that I wasn't stepping on any toes, given the nature of its content. I hope you find this useful.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading.
submitted by jaykresge to pcgaming [link] [comments]

Investing in Exchanges- A fair comparision between Binance, Coss and Kucoin.

Hello fellow crypto currency roller coaster riders! We are quite deep in the bear market, and today I wanted to talk about investing in cryptocurrency exchanges. Not by purchasing market shares, but by holding their native tokens for utility and of course, growth in the future. I do not work in finance, but I do like to see myself as someone always maintaining a neutral view towards projects. Because a open mind is always better when money is involved, even more when holding "bags" yourself.
(You can scroll down for a TL;DR and for fees)

Please note this article is about investing in exchanges, not which exchange is the best for you to trade at.
I only mention these three exchanges because of personal experience with them. There are many more so this article could only be of partial help to you.

Why investing in (most) exchanges is exciting and with less overall risk:

Let me start this article by showing my excitement for these investments. Instead of hoping that one of the 100+ currency-replacing coins will become a global used coin on the whole globe, by investing in the exchanges themselves, you only risk money on the exchanges becoming a success. A bear market, while negatively impacting exchanges as well, is not half as bad as it is bad as for other coins. Because exchanges mostly win and grow based on volume. We all know how much volume bitcoin has, since it dropped below 6000. The main risk here, in my opinion, is if the exchanges themselves will make it (because there's quite a lot of them), and grow more, and if the cryptocurrency market itself will survive. The latter I have no doubt of. Of Course, standard risks apply as well. Successful hacks or drama will always damage the tokens a lot, but this goes for every project out there.
I want to talk and compare 3 exchanges in this article. Binance, COSS, and Kucoin. I know there are a few more exchanges out there with native tokens as well, but forgive me that I don't have time to research all of them. Some of these exchanges are actually fairly high risk compared to others I am not mentioning, because I do not have experience with them. I recommend you to read this article and put it next to other articles to make your own conclusions and make your own investment advice.
Before I start comparing these three exchanges, I do want to write a little about DEX's. (Decentralised Exchanges).

-----Decentralised Exchanges-----

I feel decentralised exchanges hold no future. The nature of true decentralisation means the exchange can hold no funds, which means that every trade done on the platform requires more fees because its sending it between wallets. (But less fees if you transfer a lot of money) Not only this, but these DEX's sound like heaven to wash money in, so they may get shut down. (Because they do not need KYC) And if you are thinking that they won't, because they are decentralised and can't get shut down, then you are gravely mistaken, because law enforcement definitely has its ways to force the developer's to push a update that breaks the exchange. However, people have to admit that these exchanges are interesting, because security would probably be top notch at most of these DEX's, since it holds no funds whatsoever. It can still fall victim if there is a fault somewhere that allows a hacker to abuse a exploit (and then for example replacing a wallet address), but the chances on this are less than with centralised exchanges.

-----Binance-----

Binance is the top exchange out there. Not immediately by the top exchange volume, but because it has many altcoins that people appreciate. It has top notch support and is a very trustworthy service that has proven itself to also be reliable and fast. I also love its advanced features and UI, and the liquidity and volume it has on most coins makes trading simple. There are almost no negative things to say about binance, I did not experience any negatives anyway, so far.
So now it's token: BNB.
BNB is a growing token that still grows in utility- you can even get hotel rooms with BNB now. But the most important use is the fee cut on the exchange. If you do a trade and you pay 10 euro fee, it will become 7.5 euro paid in BNB, if you have BNB in your binance wallet. Because binance is at the top, people will flock towards binance to trade again. And the good amount of volume makes people want to purchase BNB tokens. Not the mention with the increasing amount of use cases for BNB, it makes more and more sense for people to hold some of it. Although I do have to note that the market cap of BNB is already quite high, so I do not expect huge growth. It should also be noted that every year, the fee cut gained from using BNB tokens will be decreased. Thus value may also therefore drop.
Investment Opinion BNB: I would consider BNB a medium-high risk investment. This is because everyone knows to trust Binance, and it works really well, so I do not see them fall in the top used exchanges. The token earns use cases every year, however their main utility becomes less powerful every year, which is a red flag for investors. Personally not invested anymore.

-----COSS-----

Coss is something different. They actually have two native tokens: CFT and COSS. Coss had quite a buggy past, but seemed to have learned it's lessons regarding outsourcing development and have shown improvement. All of the past and how they improved can also be read on their medium posts. Support was the one time I needed to use it, fast and friendly. They now hired a in-house development team that build a successful exchange before. The recent released 1.2 version is a huge improvement over the buggy older version, that barely got used for good reason. With 1.2, they also introduced CFT, a token that just like BNB allows you to pay the fees using CFT. This will effectively cut all your trading fees by 25%, the same as binance currently does, without plans to make the cut less effective over the years. I feel COSS is on the right path. I think the token’s low market cap is because it's negative past and people moved on, but now coss is pushing forwards fast and seems to become a good competitive exchange. COSS seeks and seems to become best of all exchange worlds combined, and 1.2 shows they are well on their way. The risk on purchasing and holding COSS is due to the question: Can COSS get more users and bots for volume? At least to get to the 8.5 million daily to run even? They have shown (so far) that they are ready, but it’s a big step. There are still bugs to squash, still functions to add. But I can't ignore that 1.2 is a big step up.
So now it's tokens: COSS and CFT.
Purchasing COSS tokens will get you passive income over time. Every week (and in the future every day) the income from fees of the exchange are split in half. Half goes towards the company, and half goes towards COSS token holders. These are paid in literary all the coins that are paid by fees. So if bitcoin is traded the most, you will see mostly bitcoin appear in your passive income wallet. I find it's not only fun to watch getting tiny amounts of coins, but also fun to play around with calculations and see the amount of income we can get as volume increases. And we have to keep in mind coss-fsa.com income is calculated on current rates. Should we enter a bull market again, the income in dollars will only rise up.
A small negative here, is that to receive small received coins from holding COSS, you must convert them to ETH or pay for receiving them. As to my understanding, this is a backup to make sure COSS cannot be noted as a security. (And a singapore lawyer already gave the opinion COSS is a utility token). Coss will be holding promo’s sometimes to convert all received coins into CFT or other possible coins. Participating in these promo’s will be entirely optional though.
However you should also note that currently about 90 million coss tokens receive the passive income, out of a 200 million total supply. CFT fee cutting is also taking a bite from the average fee. So it is hard to make a estimate of what average fee to input on a calculator like coss-fsa.com. I find that COSS is a "high risk high gain" investment, because COSS admitted to need about 8.5 million dollar of volume daily to run even. They could have used the CFT utility on COSS tokens. But they did not, this shows that COSS needs additional funds to grow. I do not mind, this CFT causes additional attraction to use the exchange and will provide COSS with extra income it can use, to make themselves and token owners be successful. Win-Win? With CFT being an attractive option, with a well working API, fast deposits and a much more bug-free and stable 1.2 version right now, the growth potential for COSS is definitely there. You should note that COSS went from 0.4 million daily volume to 1.5 already. That is a growth of nearly 4x already. But to also be fair here, COSS is running on half fees this month only. So perhaps this volume might go down again next month. Unless more users and bots will come, of course. Coss's market cap is very low, and volume as well, because it's a platform that needs to prove itself to be reliable and trustworthy. In my opinion, it is already attractive enough for traders to come, and if COSS keeps this up, I feel COSS will meet a bright future.
Investment Opinion COSS: I find coss a attractive well-working platform since 1.2 and might even consider using it as main exchange, if it will house my favorite altcoins in the future. I will not rate it fully high risk, but more as medium-high risk as investment, because I feel COSS definitely delivered with the 1.2 update and have shown good potential, and growth is already proven.
Investment Opinion CFT: I feel i explained enough about CFT above as well, and would recommend purchasing it for traders, but not for holders currently. I say that because the price of CFT is 10 cents currently, and COSS tokens are currently lower in price, which I feel should not be correct a correct value between coss and ctf.

-----Kucoin-----

Kucoin is in many ways like COSS. They have proven themselves with a stable exchange that has a attractive UI and API, and that shows in their KCS token market cap. They also have a similar token usage and even the UI looks similar. However, I do not have much good to say about kucoin. I had contact with their support team twice, and I feel I was not helped well enough. Once time, I had nano transferred to Kucoin, and it took a full hour to deposit. (Nano is instant, so I panicked after 10 minutes and being fairly new at crypto) After around 30 hours of writing the support request, I got this reply: https://i.redd.it/4h8idfbtkoe01.jpg
Note that this was a support team member, telling me to write "suppoet" if "still not work".
Another time, i deposited eth to Kucoin and it took way longer. The transaction already showed it was successfully confirmed and received on the wallet address on kucoin, yet kucoin persisted that it was the fault of binance and told me to solve it with them. So Kucoin has quite bad support, in my experience.
Furthermore, the platform is not true to promises and shady. I am also a moderator in Gladius, which has its native token as well. Kucoin states they give a head's up of 30 days before delisting. Kucoin did not give this head's up, and decided to delist Gladius's native token GLA because the lack of volume. They said they would delist it after ~30 hours in their message. After around 8 hours, it was already not possible to trade it anymore. So a double promise broken.
Finally as a example is that kucoin stopped withdrawals of USDT, at the same time the market panicked about USDT. This probably caused a lot of trading and in turn, extra volume for Kucoin.
So now its token: KCS.
Again I have to be quite negative here. KCS holders are entitled to 50% of the profit Kucoin gets from trading fees. They also get a fee cut on trading by holding KCS. Sounds attractive right? Well....Not so much.
First of all, Kucoin has a high probability of a secret system in place that will will give more income to kucoin, and less to KCS holders, at certain volume achieved by kucoin. At more than 50 million dollar traded daily, they start to reduce the 50% fair split to KCS holders. Even better, should the exchange ever reach 350 million volume daily, the 50% split will be reduced to 15%. The worst about this all, is that kucoin is hiding this from its users. When asking this question, no one will give you a clear answer. They will simply link you with how KCS works. Apparently this feature was also confirmed on their reddit and initial whitepaper, but all traces about this has been removed. Yet when asking about it, no one denies it, neither confirms it.
Furthermore, you do not get a coin variation passive income like with COSS. No, all trade fees are simply converted to KCS, and then distributed to KCS holders. So you basically purchase KCS...to get more KCS. This may sound attractive to prevent tiny amounts of "dust" like on coss, but with coss you will also get options to convert all your dust to CFT later.
Lastly, you could hold KCS to reduce trading fees, but you will need a lot, for a tiny discount. For holding 1000 KCS, you will get a 1% cut on fees. so 0,1% becomes 0,099%. The maximum discount is 30%, wich you get by holding 30.000 KCS. A small positive is that fees are then not paid in KCS. You keep the KCS. With binance and COSS, the fee is paid in their CFT and BNB tokens, so you lose the token over much trading.
Investment Opinion KCS: I cannot say that Kucoin is a real bad investment perse, because they are clearly doing well, for whatever reason that may be. I will not come back to kucoin unless there is a token on there that I cannot get anywhere else, and then i will transfer that token out of kucoin. I would -personally- never ever invest in KCS and I will stay away from kucoin at all times.

-----TL;DR-----

Investing in exchanges is in my opinion one of the safest bets to make in cryptocurrencies, especially during this bear market.
Decentralised Exchanges probably hold no future due to regulation and higher fees.
Binance is the most used exchange for most, and is proven trustworthy, fast, stable and has many good options and liquidity. BNB tokens are an medium-high risk investment, because the market cap is already high, and its main utility of cutting fees, will grow less effective in time, but is still currently an attractive token.
COSS is a exchange which is progressing fast, but has a bad history due to bugs and a mediocre UI. Can they become one of the top players? Yes they can if they continue like this. Time will tell if they gather enough trust and stability, and with trust and stability more users. COSS tokens are a medium-high risk to make a high passive income later or sell the tokens for high profit.
Why people use Kucoin is beyond me. They are shady and not true to promises. would not recommend using it, neither would I recommend holding it's token, but facts do remain that they are doing well so far. I don't think they hold much future value because of the negative things I noted.
Bitcoin can go down and destroy all your initial investment amounts, no matter what project you put it in. Risk factor: Very high.

-----Fees-----

Binance:
https://www.binance.com/en/fee/schedule (You can pay fees using BNB. Gives 25% discount currently. Will lower each year till 0%)
Kucoin:
https://news.kucoin.com/en/fee/ (Holding 1000 to 30.000 KCS gives you 1% to 30% discount on fees, that does not cost you KCS.)
COSS:
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/1*ykozhrtDOE6y4vT5hFj92g.jpeg
(You can pay fees using CFT. Gives 25% discount currently. Will always stay 25% or more, might increase actually in time. Confirmed by COSS staff.)
(The more volume you make as trader, the less fee you pay)

Thank you for reading!

submitted by borgqueenx to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

FAQs

FAQs - All Frequently Asked Questions Posted and Updated Here
Q: I have lost massive sums holding various cryptocurrencies since leading coins such as Ethereum have fallen -88% peak-to-trough so far in 2018 and it looks as if it will fall further given the overpriced nature of Ethereum. Vitalik Buterin, the creator of Ethereum said himself that the cryptospace is way too overvalued. That said, why do I want my money tied up on your platform for 9 months? What are the advantages? How much risk am I taking?
A: With Hansecoin, multiple investors will be able to own a piece of the capital gain potential and yield of real estate, some land, an apartment, or an entire apartment complex. The asset provides a floor to the price and increases stability versus speculative tokens.
We are building out the world's first tokenisation platform that will be compliant with regulations. The first project Use Case when secured may deliver underlying yields of 7 to 11.4% or higher, potential capital gains, and provide bonuses and access to future project tokens at an attractive discount versus those joining after the Vesting Period. There is a revolutionary future in its application across multiple asset classes. Notably, this tokenisation approach may become a template for asset backed token projects.
With proof of concept at hand and construction started, the project shall be scaled up as several additional hard asset projects are in the queue and the platform can be white labelled. Our platform offers a replacement tool for the transaction-cost-inefficient closed-end fund structures or venture capital transactions while remaining small, solid, compact and in full regulatory compliance.
Reduced Risk: We are immune to the direction of cryptospace. Even if Ethereum were to go to zero, our token would still be valid and contractually binding. In light of the steep losses in Ethereum and other coins, the participant can stop the hemorrhaging by locking in their cryptocurrencies at a fixed rate in euros for the next 9 months while taking comfort in knowing the above benefits apply, ie, yields, capital gains, bonuses, future project access at a discount, etc. Further, the potential participation in prime residential real estate located a brief commute of 15 minutes from the city center in Tallinn, Estonia carries low risk given the history of otherwise equivalent, yet in terms of quality, design and attractiveness, inferior real estate projects launched in the neighbourhood which still sold out ahead of schedule. Indeed, the demographics of families in formation together with Estonia leading the EU in economic growth is a powerful combination contributing to the breakneck speeds of development in Tallinn.
Estonia has continuously the highest average GDP in the EU (if you compare the current members from 1994 to 2018) and thus is the EU’s fastest growing country. Estonia has been billed as the world’s leading digital nation given its pioneer status of its digital ID card program, the spread of free and ultra high speed WiFi across the country, being the pond from where Skype and Pipedrive sprung, and more. Today, its welcoming position on blockchain technologies, equivalent to that of Switzerland, as well as its e-Residency program is well known. e-Residency enables businesses to transact goods and services regardless of geographic location with the digital signature capacity known from the ID card program. Estonia’s regulators are sincerely collaborative, open for discussion, and evidently working with substantial commitment to create a fair system of regulation, monitoring and enforcement of the current legislation. They are comparatively solution driven so as to remain welcoming to the blockchain community. This explains why Estonia has the highest number of ICOs launched per capita and is ranked #5 worldwide.
From the CEO of CoinMetro, Kevin Murcko: “Although I get approached quite often to advise on ICO projects I rarely bite. Most, while they may be great 'back of napkin ideas' they usually lack substance and their teams, while sometimes quite elaborate, lack the drive, hunger, and experience to take a great idea and turn it into a great business. HanseCoin is different. The company focuses on a very specific use case for tokenization, the Asset-Backed Token, and it puts it to the test.
Not only does it provide a hedge against crypto volatility but it puts that money toward the creation of a regulator-approved platform for tokenizing any hard asset.
As a member of the Supervisory Board, I helped design the tokenization structure and I believe there is a revolutionary future in its application across multiple asset classes.
As As CEO of CoinMetro is it my job to ensure that we are constantly on the lookout for ways to gain market share and add value to not only our platform but the whole of the crypto ecosystem ... Essentially we are talking about an extension of the ICOexpress, call it a 'module', one of many in the works.”

Q: How are you compliant? Many ICOs fail to be even minimally compliant.
A: First, this is not a typical ICO but this structure represents the next evolutionary stage in asset financing in the cryptospace. We are one of if not the world’s first actual asset backed token (ABT) ICO backed by real estate. Together with our counsel and our partners from Coin Metro, we have stayed in lock-step with the regulators here in Estonia to ensure that regardless of future regulatory decisions made, due to the versatility of the project structure, it will remain compliant without that adversely affecting the business. Our token remains a utility token as demonstrated by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) as it is neither a security, a debenture, nor a money market instrument. Still, we are prepared to issue a security token in the future should it become a suitable option and make sense to our expansion. Albeit that from our discussion with the relevant authorities it seems unlikely today Estonia may well pass legislation in this regard. Most importantly, leading companies are connected to our platform and its first project: we have Capital Mill, a leading developer and asset manager, as the real estate project manager, Uusmaa Kinnisvarabüro, the oldest and largest brokerage firm in Estonia as the residential sales agent, SWECO Projekt as the engineering company, 1Partner, a leading valuation company, as our appraiser, Telora AS as our supervisor, Studiomark as our architectural firm, and leading Estonian construction firms allowing the project to be built on time and in suitable quality for the residential clients.

Q: Is VPAT compliant? Does VPAT obey regulation? What about the other tokens PPT and VBT?
A: VPAT is an island, disconnected, and not tradable. Is it non-transferrable thus not a security. VPAT is heavily vetted and all VPAT holders are registered via AML/KYC with CoinMetro. Should our Issuing Company decide to issue another token (PPT, etc), that token may become tradeable and subject to regulatory law at that point.
There is an inherent difference and segregation of the VPAT from the potential PPT or VBT tokens. At the end of 9 months, the VPATs are burned, swapped, or extended and only then are PPTs issued. VPAT holders get various bonuses and preferred issuance of PPTs.
The VPAT is a centralised virtual token which results in a receipt issued to the VPAT participants (like a voucher). It is not an Ethereum based ERC distributed token unlike the PPT which may become subject to the legal, technical and regulatory environment.
As always, we will comply with any future legal, technical, and regulatory law set forth.

Q: What are the advantages of your platform?
A: Our platform offers a replacement tool for a variety of transaction cost inefficient transaction structures. The unwieldy closed-end funds of yesteryear simply front load developments with heavy hand costs for management and distribution. They typically start at around 10 million euros. Friends & family and crowd funding asset capital raises are typically limited to 1.5 – to at best 2 ¼ million euros. Our platform enables a far more efficient and less costly way for anyone who wishes to tokenise a project and raise capital between 1.5 and 10 million euros for their hard asset project, including but not limited to real estate. Blockchain simplifies and facilitates transactions by removing redundant layers.

Q: Future plans to expand?
A: An asset backed tokenisation does not end with standard real estate. This can also be done with other associated hard assets such as factories which include identifiable, traceable and productive machinery and equipment. Indeed, the founders and their partners are themselves invested in industrial assets, farming and agritech. We believe that such capital intensive segments are ideal candidates for subsequent, larger asset backed tokenisation capital raises when the concept with its technology and documentation is proven.
Eventually, HanseCoin, subject to project success, markets and regulation, may even become an issuing house with an investment advisory license. We will also enable others to white label our product since a number of projects have expressed deep interest. Indeed, as stated in the above article, a number of notable voices in the blockchain space such as Multicoin Capital partner Kyle Samani have said, "Using blockchains, you can securitize any asset for 1/100th the cost.” According to Prof. Stephen McKeon of the University of Oregon, "We will undoubtedly see tokenized real estate securities in 2018." An analyst at Apex Token Fund went on to explain, "A new level of liquidity is created when tokenizing traditional assets. This liquidity makes it faster and easier to rebalance a portfolio as the market changes."

Q: Please explain unpaid taxes to the Estonian government as raised here: https://www.reddit.com/CoinMetro/comments/9lyjie/comment/e7g8ws6
A: First, Tiskre Residentsid paid its October land taxes. The company had EUR 3,407.31 land tax to pay which EMTA demands on Oct 1, and we had scheduled to pay them alongside TSD declaration by Oct 10. Notably, we paid it today ahead of time. There is no tax debt and we would expect this to be reflected with the usual delay at sources such as ‘Inforegister’.
Second, Reval Grundwert is a family venture which arranges services to group entities including concept and implementation design, engineering and supervision, planning, family investment. A previous accountant miscalculated and misrepresented two smaller tax filings for which she taken to account and court. The restatement and reconciliation is underway with EMTA.

Q: How do you securitize the asset? Is it asset backed at the beginning?
A: The VPAT token is issued and provides a receipt as noted in the info memo. Funds are employed for the project platform infrastructure/software development and to secure the use case. The owners contribute the land into the asset company at a EUR 459,810 or a 15.4% discount to appraised market value to effectively sponsor the platform development for the Use Case even ahead of the full raise and the potential PPT issuance. The externally appraised value only reflects a sale as is: no potential, no expected value increases, it is considered conservative. Initially, the Issuer provides a deposit to the Asset Company owners in lieu of the irrevocable undertaking to, in the future, enter into the contracts. The deposit in this instance covers 90% of the fixed asset price. All-in the relevant discount to fair market value is thus 23.8% which should be considered a substantial buffer.
From the closing of the hard floor raise through the VPAT, the Issuer by securing itself with the future documentation in escrow, irrevocable undertakings locked in, and a pledge over the asset company's shares, is collateralised throughout its infrastructure development phase. Even the VPAT is an asset backed token.
Note, in the unlikely event that the tokenisation were to fail with no regulatorily compliant tokenisation at hand or the Issuer to fail in its development, the Issuer would accelerate the share pledge against the Asset Company. The asset could be sold and even a fire sale should suffice to cover the Issuer's relevant risk exposure, a restructuring, rescission, or new development in light of the aformentioned large discount.
In case of questions please do not hesitate to ask.

Q: How long do actual building developments take? [USE CASE]
A: In a simplified form and besides weather conditions etc., individual buildings and their build out time depend on the building types of which there are 2 in sector 1 (one apartment, one row house), another one in sector 2 (simpler row houses) and again two types in sector 3 (apartment buildings) plus a kindergarten on the plot between 2 and 3. Some of them such as in sector 1 individually take between 6 and 7 months to build core and shell, and subject to the client package requirements (three pre-defined), the interior furnishing and fittings takes between 1 and 1.5 months. The row houses in sector 2 can be erected within 5-6 months, then interiors and the furnishing as above plus landscaping (seasonal). The affordable housing in sector 3 could be built in the same time frame for the simpler apartment buildings and about 11 months for a grouping of three which are best erected as an ensemble.
A time schedule has been defined by the accredited, experienced external project management firm with owners, engineers, architects, interior architects and reputable construction companies which shows the targeted build out rhythm with overlapping and parallel build-outs. You can find this information in the project model section p.30 onwards. If you have specific questions do not hesitate to contact us and we shall be glad to go through this in applicable detail with you.
If you look at the plots and the drone videos listed for the asset company you can see that infrastructure (road, electricity, gas, water, sewage and street lighting) has been built out already alongside sector 3 and 2. Key information and extensive descriptions are also at hand in the info memo.

Q: Are all incoming ETH converted to EUR immediately?
A: Yes, though subject to market conditions. For example, the time it took to get sufficient confirmations was considerably longer in December 2017 when the crypto market was spiking. Until our minimum target of 2.281671m EUR is received, the deposit required to secure the projects initial use case, all incoming ETH is converted to EUR. Once this amount is surpassed, Hansecoin reserves the right to hold qualities of ETH as it sees fit based in its internal risk management policies.

Q: What happens if the soft cap for your asset raise is not met?
A: I presume you are referring to the hard floor of EUR 3.275 M as a fall-back rather than the soft or target cap. Were that hard floor fail to be reached, the software and platform infrastructure development would have to be carried on by HanseCoin preferably with its community in parallel to progressing with the road map, however, after an extension window of e.g. another 10, 15 or even 30 days were to run out before reaching the hard floor, and if no restructuring of the agreements with the asset owners could be agreed upon (deposit levels, timing), the development would have to carry on without securing the use case. The latter would remain an obligation of the owners to develop without HanseCoin. In turn, in such an unlikely event, HanseCoin would have to secure another Use Case for which it has two more assets at hand in the same attractive area, one in a comparable development stage and one at an earlier stage. Both would allow for collateralisation and lower deposit levels so that a replacement would be a suitable option. As stated in the info memo if less (as in not enough to entertain any of the other options) is raised until a future PPT issuance on the basis of the Hansecoin platform, the VPAT may have to be rescinded.
Notably, the aforementioned time frame and cascade of options should, from our perspective, allow HanseCoin sufficient capacity to attain sufficient commitment from VPAT partners and progress with the Asset Company on mutually agreeable terms.

Q: What if you can't get approved to go on with the development, or when the approval is getting delayed an unreasonable (>1y?) amount of time?
A: The risk of development of the tokenisation to become regulatorily compliant is mitigated as follows: HanseCoin will file alongside its efforts to create the PPTs, its application to attain an investment firm license in Estonia allowing it to act as fund manager. This puts it on the safe side if considerations of certain tokens as securities were to become effective. The board and supervisory board of HanseCoin assisted by counsel and auditors will take all necessary steps and employ their professional experience to meet the requirements and become licensed in the defined regulatory process. As indicated in the roadmap, CoinMetro as an exchange requires substantially more comprehensive licensing for a variety of their additional services to be rendered in the future and is seeking theirs with a view to having them in place by end of Q2 2019.
If the technical development of the tokenisation were to be delayed beyond the date of regulatory compliance, HanseCoin with the VPAT has the option to seek an extension to complete whatever technical matters would have to be resolved, albeit that the economic interest at hand should mitigate that. HanseCoin is keen to issue, list, and expand their tokenisation platform approach to a wide audience of potential participants and process a variety of underlying hard assets, as only then it is successful. The interest of HanseCoin's founders and team are aligned with the VPAT holders. We will push the development with determination and daily grind. As such we believe that a delay as you indicated beyond a month or even three months over the Vesting Period whilst technically possible is highly unlikely.

Q: What can HanseCoin offer me that I already do not have access to? I can already directly invest in property or buy equity in residental property via crowdfunding websites etc. What I cannot do as a U.K. citizen is easily invest in overseas property, does HanseCoin fix that problem? In addition will HanseCoin give people in emerging markets easy access to say, European and American property? What kind of restrictions might I face if , as a U.K. citizen, I wanted to buy an ABT for a U.S. property?
A: You can own a piece of real estate in any jurisdiction via our platform, ie, fractional ownership. As we onboard new projects, some will be European. The US comes with certain restrictions that may make onboarding US based projects an issue. At this time, the projects of interest are non-US. We will be sure we are compliant with any projects we approve.
Re crowd funding, on our home page at Hansecoin.com, scroll down and read:
Let’s talk about The Gap.

Q: Can I own Hansecoin if I am a US resident?
A: As referred to in the disclaimers of the info memo and the webpage, HanseCoin with its ongoing private sale and the upcoming public sale in principle is currently not offered to participants who are U.S. residents as regulation so implies and we are not offering securities at this time. Without providing legal advice, a private pre-sale may e.g. allow up to 35 non-accredited investors to participate under certain limitations and exemptions under rule 506 (b), however it may have little bearing on us as the private (pre-)sale of Hansecoin VPAT's would likely be considered a form of general solicitation in the U.S. Thus, in consideration of rule 506 (c) only accredited investors, i.e. those who can verify that they are, may have a path to participate in the private (pre-) sale. May we suggest to consider this with counsel and message us directly so that we can review the matter, in case you are an interested accredited investor. We obviously value your interest and shall be glad to continue the dialogue. It is not unlikely with upcoming regulation in Estonia and the EU as well as HanseCoin progressing to become a regulated investment firm in the near future that future issues including a potential mastercoin could be offered also in the U.S. We certainly would be glad if market rules were to allow truly global coverage.
NEW FAQS FOR RON TO POST ON WEBSITE:

Q: Did I understand correctly, that HanseCoin is a overarching platform for more asset backed token projects? That token PPT token itself is not limited to the current real estate (RE) you are developing? If so, what happens if let's say, the current RE is finished and you start another project, will there then the same process as now, but with a PPT2?
A: HanseCoin is an overarching platform and not limited to one project, albeit that the first project contributed at a significant discount to the platform to support its launch carries itself and the platform build-out. HanseCoin's goal is to efficiently onboard a variety of projects which fit the 'Gap' range for development capital, i.e. small/mid cap project financings for hard assets. We have three projects in the short term pipeline which shall be launched in stages over the next months. The structuring employed in the initial project can, as per current review be rolled out in more than a dozen, potentially more jurisdictions of the current EU-27. Variations of the structure used by HanseCoin render it sufficiently resilient to over time include more hard assets including factory machinery and equipment as well as segments such as rolling stock. However, we start with something small, solid and compact in real estate development where platform and participants in its onboarded project(s) can capitalise on sufficient potential to reap liquidity premiums and reduce transaction cost through tokenisation.

Q: Can I draw a similarity to Coin Metro’s (CM's) ICO express here: Both HanseCoin and ICO Express to onboard external projects? Now you guys lead the real estate (RE) development yourself, but maybe the next project is developed by an external team but uses your platform for tokenization?
A: I would say that we will work closely with CM's on their ICO Express, as there is no need to reinvent the wheel and we believe that they are in the process of setting up an excellent platform. Technically, I would consider us the Asset Financing Module associated with/connected to their platform. Given our understanding of RE in specific and asset financing in general the intention is to process a series of projects and develop the capacity of HanseCoin to assess, validate, wherever needed structure and adapt/improve underlying projects with strong project financing parties (project managers, engineers, architects, banks, brokers, supervisors, construction companies) etc. - we facilitate the RE development or third party projects employing HanseCoin as the project tokenisation platform.
In other asset finance segments, such as factory and machinery, the industries we can work with are widely varied, as Chris just stated, this can be biotech as well as manufacturing, the key is the underlying asset.
For retail solutions the logistics solutions connecting e-commerce and highstreet require substantial investments in hardware, data processing capacity and software. Whilst the line there blurs between pure hard assets and its steering/process technology, the physically distributed logistics aspect is intriguing and we believe we can in the future benefit from tokenisation.

Q: I'm interested in finding out more re contributing to the private sale (amount of funds being raised, minimum contribution size, etc).
A: Pursuant to ongoing discussions with a variety of interested parties including family offices across Germany, Austria and Scandinavia committing to certain amounts we have created a sliding incentive scale for those entering the Private Sale:
During the current phase up till the hard floor for the platform build-out we offer small, yet attractive discounts to early bird participants, whereas larger ticket sizes obtain higher discounts. Parties committing participations of EUR 50,000k receive a discount (as a token amount bonus) of 2.25%, EUR 100,000 equates 2.5% discount/bonus, EUR 200,000 results in 3% discount/bonus and tickets of EUR 500 k and above receive a 4% discount/ bonus.
For those followers here on Telegram the ticket sizes can be amended but discounts/bonus tokens of 1% kick in starting at EUR 10,000 (equivalent in ETH).
For the sake of good order, recently we have done one brief flash sale to reward our hardcore followers, tech contributors and early birds at a significant one time only 5% discount/bonus. We do not envisage it to be repeated.
As the token vesting period ends after latest 9 months and a tradable token is then issued even the lowest rung of discounts is slightly better than many peer products and approaches, certainly better than parking it in money market products. For small to medium size participants, generally, parking liquidity in attractive vehicles with underlying real estate and hard assets in Europe is not such a bad idea at this time. The tokens are available at short notice.
If this is of interest to you please advise which volumes in the above brackets you wish to pursue and we shall open the Private Sale to you.

Q: How does HanseCoin compare to other companies attempting to issue asset backed tokens? Aren’t such tokens securities?
A: Hansecoin has a unique approach in that it has achieved regulatory compliance even with token issuance. Have a look at the Whitepaper. Normally, tokens of this nature will be regulated as securities. So for HanseCoin to stay compliant, we have a regulatorily compliant token (VPAT) for the platform which is already asset backed. It is non-negotiable, non-transferrable, and non-tradeable thus is not a security token. HanseCoin will later issue tokenized securities known as PPTs upon being regulated as an investment firm in lock-step with what EU / Estonian regulators decide.
As noted, Hansecoin is live already. Its original token, the VPAT, is already asset backed and called an ABT. Due to substantial demand from private equity we are in a private sale at the moment. If and when suitable a public sale may be announced.
So, no more weeks of waiting as with so many others. If you are interested to enter into the private sale please register and let us know. [my note: Smartlands has launched their mastercoin which should be a security since it is tradeable but not issuing tokenized securities as of yet.]

Q: How can HanseCoin claim to have first mover advantage compared to, say, Smartlands, when HanseCoin hasn't even finished its capital raise or developed its platform? If my understanding is correct, Smartlands completed their token sale last year and have already developed their core platform
Also, I'm finding the whitepaper diifficult to digest. It’s very wordy. I'm sure the key points could be presented more succinctly.
A: For the sake of good order, Smartlands has placed its token but is not asset backed from the begininng. By the way, it has lost -24.8% from its peak 4 days ago, though through its excellent PR, I believe it is the only coin that has outperformed bitcoin this year, which attests to the power of the asset backed token.
That said, Smartlands does not have any live project. HanseCoin has not made such claims but is the first regulated asset backed token in that it has the underlying asset pledged to it in proportion to the funds raised, and one live project plus three which its shareholders have either secured or control over. The issuance of the HanseCoin PPT token is solely deferred due to and dependent on the current regulation. In order to become independent from that, HanseCoin will file to become a regulated investment adviser in December so that by February it can issue securities and thus tokenised securities no matter what ambiguity may exist then for other token approaches.
In the meantime, those who are holding HanseCoin VPAT tokens whose value is not pegged to any cryptocurrency but to hard assets sidestepped the recent huge drop seen in bitcoin and most all other cryptocurrencies. The average cryptocurrency has now lost over 90% of its value in 2018. Meanwhile, the value of the VPAT is pegged to the euro and the underlying asset.
Besides blockchain related software improvements, the current platform development is predominantly geared to the expansion into 17 EU jurisdictions and related systems compatibility, database design, and applicable interfaces, compliance process designs, linkage with exchanges, as well as research and development into future tokenisation components.
As to the whitepaper, based on requirements of the EFSA (the Estonian regulator), PWC Legal as our counsel, auditors, and tax advisers, we have to reflect the matter comprehensively. The summary pages tend to be important whilst the flow charts are there to assist with visuals.
Whilst you may consider it excessive, we have condensed both the tokenisation and the use case significantly. Some of our team have longstanding careers in investment banking, corporate audit, and structured finance. Any offering circular in asset backed bonds, a closed end fund prospectus or an euqity placement memorandum would run into hundreds of pages and a 8x multiple word count.
Our target was to simplify the sourcing, issuance and distribution of asset financing with benefits to participants and developers alike whilst substantially reducing transaction cost to enable and accelerate that. That is the key proposition of blockchain and only our platform is live and doing that. Having a listed token today is secondary.
Here are some bullet points which focus on the key points to our platform:
· First-mover Advantage - HanseCoin is the world's first regulated blockchain platform to tokenise hard assets;
· Technology - Solid Blockchain technology applied properly greatly lowers transaction costs across the board from project inception to completion thus participants reap high yields;
· Demand - Leading developers and sponsors across Europe wish to onboard their projects onto our platform;
· Regulatory Compliant - Regulatory passporting capacity into the majority of EU markets and capacity to go beyond;
· Client Access to Higher Yield - Development projects bring high yields to people who are not classic development investors at a time of historically low interest rates;
· Risk Mitigation - Excellent diversification opportunity to peg capital to the value of the underlying hard assets.
· Ongoing Transaction & Success Fee Generation - The platform generates ongoing transaction fees per project. The more projects and more participants, the higher the profits which are shared between Participants and the platform.
But the way, together with CoinMetro (www.coinmetro.com) and its CEO Kevin Murcko we will at Slush to present their exchange and our platform as the first solid Asset Backed Token for hard assets to listed on CoinMetro.

Q: How do projects such as https://www.meridio.co compete with HanseCoin?
A: Meridio.co offers fractional ownership which, whilst fine as a concept, does not lend itself to fit the tokenised securities approach EU regulators are starting to take (they have MIFID, AIFM, etc. to work with) and the specific segment of project/asset financing where development capital is actually required, the small and mid cap segment in Europe and beyond (we call it 'the gap' of EUR 1.5 to EUR 10 m of equity participations in projects) is not addressed. HanseCoin already owns shovel ready land and its platform is regulated.

Q: A few questions:
1a. Which tokens do private sale participants receive for their contribution? VPAT, PPT or both?
2a. Are VPAT tokens temporary in nature, having no further use once they have been swapped or burned following the completion of the platform development?
3a. What is the main potential benefit to a participant in acquiring VPAT tokens?
4a. Is PPT the participation token for the first project only or for all future projects supported by the platform? (Or something in between?)
5a. What is the HanseCoin master token?
A:
1a. The private sale participants receive VPATs.
2a. The VPAT is the asset backed token which starts the platform and provides exclusive access to (a) the PPTs prior to them becoming tradable as well as (b) the VBTs. All VPATs are burned, swapped, or extended at the end of the vesting period.
3a. The VPAT provides exclusive access to future tokens including the tradeable PPT, VBTs for bonuses, and potential further privileges which the platform may grant to its early sponsors and participants. The VPAT is also the only path to secure discounted PPT token access.
4a. As of today, the PPT covers the initial project use case. Each additional project will see an appropriate amount of PPTs issued to reflect the initial capital requirement of the underlying asset development project at its inception. During the platform development and regulation phase, additional VPATs will be issued in regard to further projects in the pipeline. The first PPT will be known as HanseCoin 8. Each additional project will countdown from 8 thus the second project will be known as HanseCoin 7, and so forth. Upon the first issuance and listing of a PPT, thus subject to further regulation of tokenised securities, it is envisaged to have VPATs only issued for each private sale phase.
5a. A master coin which represents not just one specific project but the value of HanseCoin as a whole company will be issued at some point when project tokens have gained critical mass in terms of projects, countries/markets covered and distribution. It seems likely that the countdown will fit well with this. The valuation will be dictated by the ongoing projects, projects to be on-boarded, and any white-labelling on the HanseCoin platform. We envisage that all original VPAT holders should have privileged access to an attractive bonus for the master coin which shall be accrued through VBTs during the PPT issuance period. These specific VBTs would vest until the issuance of the master coin. This is an exclusive benefit to the initial VPAT participants.

Q: So are VPAT and PPT *categories* of token rather that the actual tokens themselves? In other words, HanseCoin 8 is *a* PPT not *the* PPT? Also, if private sale participants receive VPATs, then why does hansecoin.coinmetro.com offer "HANS" tokens, which Chris tells me refers to "HanseCoin 8" tokens? Shouldn't coinmetro be offering VPAT tokens at this stage, not PPT tokens?
A: VPAT is a virtual token. PPT will be a compliant tokenized security we issue sometime next year, potentially ahead of the projected 9 month vesting period of the VPAT. The PPT will be compliant, in line with regulations as they are formed.
HANS is the ticker for the VPAT. Only the first phase VPAT currently exists that represents the first use case. HanseCoin 8 is the first use case. HanseCoin 7 will be the second use case, ticking down by one each time a new project is launched.
By the way, there is no such thing as a security token even though STO stands for security token offering. But then, many of the terms used in the cryptospace have been bastardized such as the term 'whitepaper'.

Q: I presume the VPAT for the second project will have a different ticker? What is the ticker for the first PPT (HanseCoin 8)?
A: A ticker will be assigned then by the listing exchange and the symbol is not decided, yet, although it seems reasonable to consider a variation of HANS (which is the ticker for the first VPAT) plus an indicator (technically, the ticker can remain as is whilst the sub-category is defined as an index).
submitted by HanseCoin to u/HanseCoin [link] [comments]

After four months, I have some observations and lingering questions about bitcoins

I decided to put some money into bitcoins back in December (great price!) and since then have been buying small batches. I have a few observations about what I've learned:
There's no right time to buy
Bitcoin's price has been fluctuating crazily since I first bought in, and it probably wont stop for awhile. If you're thinking of buying in for the first time but want to wait, I'd suggest just go ahead and buy in now. There wont be a magic moment to buy in (unless you keep a sharp eye out for a quick drop) and the price will keep changing. At this rate, it will probably only go up, so you might as well get off the fence and make a decision. I wish I did back in November!
Buying bitcoins is annoying
People write all the time about how easy it is to buy bitcoins. I felt comfortable investing in bitcoins because of all those kinds of statements. But I'll go ahead and say it's misleading to say buying bitcoins is easy. Rather, it's easy to buy some kinds of bitcoins- and usually at a higher price. Here are the ways I know for buying bitcoins (note, I'm in the US):
Bitcoin transfers are not instantaneous
This was something that really caught me off guard at first. Here is this new type of money that is totally digital, so it should very fast to move around. And nearly everyone claims that it is. In my experience, however, that's not true at all. I've had simple transfers of btc that linger for hours. I have no idea where they go or why certain transfers take so long, but they just do. Eventually, everything shows up, but it's very disconcerting not knowing where your digital currency is in cyberspace. Services like coinbase highlight even more the non-instantaneous nature of bitcoins. If you stick to a major exchange like mtgox, you can expect much faster transfers, but don't panic if something takes longer than a few seconds, minutes, hours etc.
Real-time bitcoin data is not always available
This is important and has a significant impact on trading. There are several sites that track btc prices in close to real-time, but often there are significant lags. This is mainly due to mtgox. The real bitcoin trading currently occurs at mtgox and the market rate is pegged to mtgox. So any lapse in data or service that occurs at mtgox ripples through the other services relying on mtgox market rates. Why does that matter? If the price of btc starts dropping by a few dollars every few minutes, and then suddenly there is no longer real-time trading data, lots of people panic and start selling. The price drops even more. It's an artificial bubble popping of sorts. While btc is decentralized, unfortunately market rates/data is still pretty centralized. And that means that information can go offline...
There's a lot about bitcoins that may go unknown
I find, for most people, bitcoins are understandable up until a certain point. When me and my buddies discuss bitcoins, inevitably we get to the question: but what are bitcoins? While we all know they're rooted in mathematical equations in "blocks," none of us understands what that means. Maybe that doesn't matter, but for some people, it will be a hard sell if you want inspire confidence in this new currency. Here's some lingering questions I still have about bitcoins, even after four months of intensive use and familiarity:
Anyways, those are just some thoughts I've had recently and felt like sharing. Here's a tldr:
TL;DR: With bitcoins, (1) first time investor? there's no right time to buy, just jump in; (2) buying bitcoins can be very annoying and overly-costly; (3) bitcoin transfers are not always instantaneous; (4) bitcoin market data is mostly centralized and not always available; (5) there are bitcoin complexities and unknowns outside the grasp of most laypeople.
edit: thanks for the informative and helpful responses!
[edit: format]
submitted by name_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: NewYorkCoin posts from 2017-07-24 to 2018-04-09 09:00 PDT

Period: 258.76 days
Submissions Comments
Total 543 3256
Rate (per day) 2.10 12.57
Unique Redditors 205 474
Combined Score 3835 6264

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1067 points, 120 submissions: hivewalletvictim
    1. Welcome Pro Snowboarder Jeff Sponzo to TEAM NYC! NewYorkCoin (NYC) has sponsored professional snowboarder Jeff Sponzo (instagram: @sp0nzo) Wish Jeff luck! He's competing in Oslo, Norway and spreading the word about NYC on his world tour!!! (33 points, 6 comments)
    2. An exhaustive email explaining NYC "roadmap" to the 'hype and scam' crowd. PLEASE READ. (31 points, 59 comments)
    3. 1,000,000 NYC BOUNTIES for every new retail/storefront business YOU get to accept NewYorkCoin in New York City. Business owner downloads Coinomi Wallet (beta) from link at newyorkcoin.net and prints their QR code for customers to pay! Business owner receives 1,000,000 NYC too! (27 points, 11 comments)
    4. Gila's Nosh | 23rd Street NOW ACCEPTS NYC! (24 points, 7 comments)
    5. LEASE NEGOTIATIONS IN PROCESS FOR AN AMAZING GALLERY SPACE IN LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN! THE NEW YORK COIN CENTER WILL BE OPENING SOON IN MANHATTAN. (24 points, 18 comments)
    6. 3 new businesses NOW ACCEPT @NewYorkCoinNYC ! Eqwipped Entertainment Recording Studio | Greenpoint, Brooklyn, An Nails Salon | Orlando, FL, Khameleon Koatings | Brattleboro, VT. newyorkcoin.net/#real (23 points, 6 comments)
    7. Another new business ACCEPTING NYC in Manhattan! Welcome the NYC Falafel Co of the Lower East Side to TEAM NYC. Merchant acceptance of NYC is starting to gain momentum... (20 points, 7 comments)
    8. NYC NOW ACCEPTED AT 14 BUSINESSES (and growing!). Welcome Paul Zepeda Gallery and Grown Fresh NYC to TEAM NYC. (19 points, 0 comments)
    9. Centre Finest Deli | New York, NY | Bitcoin ATM location | Now Supports NewYorkCoin | Acceptance Coming Soon (18 points, 4 comments)
    10. NYC Electrum-X now on github! Pull request also made to the original project: https://github.com/kyuupichan/electrumx/pull/354, once it's accepted it will be included in the master branch of electrum-x. Tip Coinomi devs! (18 points, 9 comments)
  2. 215 points, 27 submissions: Tnyc2477
    1. Calm (15 points, 10 comments)
    2. NewYorkCoin is on coinomi wallet. Coinomi is a security-first multi-asset wallet that provides native support and true ownership for 96 coins and 244 tokens, for a total of total of 340 coins and tokens, available in 168 fiat currency representations and 25 languages. (15 points, 14 comments)
    3. One special pitch for our coin to one special exchange (14 points, 10 comments)
    4. So You Want to Own Some NewYorkCoin (NYC) But Don’t Know Where to Start! Here is an Easy Guide for Beginners (14 points, 3 comments)
    5. That Perfect, Rich Exchange Everyone Needs (13 points, 7 comments)
    6. NYC Discord 2nd Meeting 1-24-2018.mp4 - Google Drive (12 points, 5 comments)
    7. Analysis of The Institutional Money On NewYorkCoin and What Our Main Objective Really Is (11 points, 7 comments)
    8. Looks a bit more crowded there on the list of Markets to trade NYC :-) (11 points, 2 comments)
    9. Please also join us at nycoincommunity for important posts from dev team. Thank you. (11 points, 20 comments)
    10. For Newly Joined Community Memebers (10 points, 0 comments)
  3. 150 points, 12 submissions: jamesburrell2
    1. Wall Street Journal article about NewYorkCoin (35 points, 25 comments)
    2. NewYorkCoin featured in Crains NewYork magazine (21 points, 5 comments)
    3. ***MUST READ FOR NEWBIES (NOOBS) trying to understanding what NewYorkCoin and other cryptocurrencies are (and are not). Very easy to read and written by a top player in the cryptocurrency space. (14 points, 2 comments)
    4. Great arguments for why NewYorkCoin's code is better for P2P micropayments than Bitcoin (14 points, 1 comment)
    5. My analogy for the early growing community of NewYorkCoin enthusiasts (NewYorkCoin is the abandoned cars and the garage is the bottom of CoinMarketCap) (13 points, 3 comments)
    6. NewYorkCoin is a technological improvement for informal value transfer systems and local currencies (12 points, 1 comment)
    7. A reminder of Bitcoin's price trajectory and potential trajectory for NewYorkCoin enthusiasts (10 points, 0 comments)
    8. YouTube user Coinreview was pretty early in identifying the promise of NewYorkCoin. (9 points, 0 comments)
    9. Good article why the NewYorkCoin community shouldn't judge the value of the coin by marketcap alone (8 points, 0 comments)
    10. Good video by the LitePay CEO (5 points, 0 comments)
  4. 129 points, 11 submissions: nodecache
    1. A New York Coin Development Vision: How BTC could be 'powered by NYC' via Lightning Network (20 points, 27 comments)
    2. Fast 'n Free Forever: an inflationary vision for a Proof of Stake New York Coin (19 points, 13 comments)
    3. Ask shapeshift and changelly to add NYC now that we're on Coinomi (18 points, 9 comments)
    4. BTC: powered by NYC - 1.1 Million NYC bounty raised for Segwit implementation (11 points, 29 comments)
    5. Requested NYC on Polo today, where are you requesting it? (11 points, 8 comments)
    6. 250,000 NYC Bounty to developer(s) to implement Segwit w/ intent to make NYC a BTC cash layer (10 points, 49 comments)
    7. Bounty update: Segwit/Lightning on NYC Roadmap (10 points, 6 comments)
    8. Alternative rebrand concept for a real artist to alter (9 points, 3 comments)
    9. Donation Address for Segwit Bounty: RGpAYLk2CtsLvBQBENQyNUhJyF8QH2zC53 (8 points, 30 comments)
    10. NYC is Checking Account to Bitcoin's Savings Account (7 points, 10 comments)
  5. 115 points, 13 submissions: gopes11
    1. Found this gem in one of the earlier posts. A lot of Great reads btw.. this guy nailed NYC (19 points, 0 comments)
    2. NYC VALUE (18 points, 1 comment)
    3. Only way NYC will go big is if we as a community come together and make it big. It’s not magic, we are investors and it is our duty to help this coin grow so developers have enough resources to further the project. (18 points, 9 comments)
    4. More exchanges is the solution (14 points, 6 comments)
    5. Dallas Mavericks announced they will accept Cryptocurrency next season.. (13 points, 3 comments)
    6. NYC ATMs (6 points, 3 comments)
    7. Reducing the supply (6 points, 2 comments)
    8. Did anyone meet up yesterday? (5 points, 5 comments)
    9. What is the next step and how can we help? (5 points, 1 comment)
    10. Go vote. Get our name out there (4 points, 0 comments)
  6. 95 points, 7 submissions: kyguy17
    1. Please vote for NYC to go on more exchanges (18 points, 13 comments)
    2. Adding NYC to tradesatoshi.com (17 points, 12 comments)
    3. Trade satoshi (16 points, 11 comments)
    4. We are accepted in Trade satoshi but (16 points, 3 comments)
    5. Added another exchange! This will be number four if we can pull it off. (15 points, 17 comments)
    6. Great job everybody that donated! I want to thank everyone for that and I want to personally thank everyone that trusted me on handling the funds. (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Why did coinomi delist NYCoin? (3 points, 26 comments)
  7. 74 points, 15 submissions: dynamicmormon
    1. A new business accepts the New York Coin. Here the link: http://www.extravagantllc.com/ (14 points, 1 comment)
    2. New acceptance of New York coin found the community website. Please look there. There is an artist mentioned. (11 points, 0 comments)
    3. Cryptonator (8 points, 0 comments)
    4. I saw something that shows the Coins gets international (8 points, 3 comments)
    5. Crex24 (7 points, 3 comments)
    6. A question about New York Coin (4 points, 12 comments)
    7. A further press report found (3 points, 1 comment)
    8. Fork (3 points, 2 comments)
    9. How are the experiences with the New York Coin Center? (3 points, 45 comments)
    10. Huobi (3 points, 0 comments)
  8. 74 points, 9 submissions: NYCoinIsTheFuture
    1. NYC Website (16 points, 18 comments)
    2. It is imperative we get this coin on SEVERAL different exchanges (11 points, 7 comments)
    3. For whomever wins the website contest (10 points, 2 comments)
    4. One last request, could we please somehow remove the scam-like all caps description under the Google search page, something as simple as New York Coin (NYC) would be good. It just doesn't feel very professional, I'm sure others agree. (9 points, 2 comments)
    5. More exchanges - stay hungry. (8 points, 3 comments)
    6. NewYorkCoin price predictions? Expectations for 2018? (7 points, 5 comments)
    7. Website Contest (7 points, 14 comments)
    8. Which website are we going with??? (4 points, 6 comments)
    9. NYC PREDICTIONS (2 points, 3 comments)
  9. 69 points, 19 submissions: NewYorkCoin
    1. THE NEW YORK COIN CENTER (12 points, 3 comments)
    2. NYC (24hr) trading volume passing $1m!!! Coinmarketcap is fixing bug that is stopping updating of volume. All markets offline at coinmarketcap. NYC TRADING VOLUME IS EXPLODING!!! (10 points, 4 comments)
    3. WIN 1,000,000 NYC! (7 points, 5 comments)
    4. newyorkcoin.net is now multi-lingual ! NYC in 17 most popular languages. Links at bottom of homepage. 1/2 on left side now completed, the rest will be live by end of weekend (7 points, 7 comments)
    5. NYC IS STARTING TO MOVE!!! NewYorkCoin getting ready to break into TOP 300 at coinmarketcap. BUY NYC AT YOBIT! Coinomi in December. NYC ATM's in January. NEW YORK COIN CENTER coming in 2018! (5 points, 0 comments)
    6. $30,000 trading volume now. And climbing... Will NYC break $50,000/day for the first time EVER soon... P.S. This is BEFORE Coinomi adds NYC! (3 points, 1 comment)
    7. MEET NEW YORK COIN (NYC) (3 points, 0 comments)
    8. THE NEW YORK COIN CENTER is looking better and better by the day! (3 points, 3 comments)
    9. Can you find any more NYC cheapies under 0.00004? Are those gone forever? Next cheapies to disappear 0.00005. My prediction is that by end of this weekend, the CHEAPEST NYC you can ever buy again will be 0.00008 (maybe higher!) nycoin.net (2 points, 2 comments)
    10. FIND NEW YORK COIN AT 2017 MACY*S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE! (2 points, 4 comments)
  10. 63 points, 4 submissions: throwawayhey1234w
    1. New website idea. The so called creator is absent from this, i can help with the website, we still need to get the blockchain working, rumbles of others workign on this but i think IF we want to drag this back from the dead we need to start reviving. (23 points, 29 comments)
    2. Nice Video For This Coin (21 points, 3 comments)
    3. Update on website, more pages. Now accpeting donations of new york coin so i can just keep powering through: REWEc7pAqxgD249pVm9aKBSaQU5nwzWhms (16 points, 9 comments)
    4. I am buying all in! (3 points, 4 comments)
  11. 61 points, 12 submissions: modoromodo
    1. Good job Newyorkcoin Team very interesting (28 points, 0 comments)
    2. NEW YORK COIN (NYC) PRICE LIVE, CRYPTOCURRENCY, NEWS, WIKI, PREDICTION (7 points, 4 comments)
    3. Who think nyc will make 0.01 soon (6 points, 6 comments)
    4. What are the best expectations for 2018 (5 points, 2 comments)
    5. NYC next year in top 10 ( very possible ) (4 points, 4 comments)
    6. SOON IN THE MOON (3 points, 0 comments)
    7. Is there news about ATMS (2 points, 2 comments)
    8. NEED MOR EXCHANGES FOR THIS COIN LIKE CRYPTOPIA . BINANCE . BITREX (2 points, 1 comment)
    9. New york coin in stocktwits (2 points, 1 comment)
    10. . (1 point, 1 comment)
  12. 53 points, 6 submissions: zer0san
    1. Reddit Banner & Marketing (17 points, 19 comments)
    2. New Variation: When needed I can make specific infographics for the website. (11 points, 5 comments)
    3. NYC Infographic Design for fun — Composition stolen from Sia ;) (8 points, 6 comments)
    4. New York Coin Reddit banner W.I.P (7 points, 13 comments)
    5. Plans for 2017/ Road map?? (7 points, 3 comments)
    6. Wanted to say Hi (3 points, 1 comment)
  13. 50 points, 4 submissions: ASSBORDERLINE
    1. COINOMI To add NYC In next update You can test NYC in there Beta App! (14 points, 2 comments)
    2. Just Bought 29 Million NYC (13 points, 14 comments)
    3. Reason Why NYC Rising & Brief History (13 points, 6 comments)
    4. ATM Coming very soon 😅 (10 points, 3 comments)
  14. 50 points, 4 submissions: CoinmaticNYC
    1. WISH US LUCK (ARTICLE ON CNBC REQUESTED)!!! (15 points, 7 comments)
    2. PLEAE READ!!! (14 points, 10 comments)
    3. FACEBOOK PAGE UPDATE (12 points, 1 comment)
    4. Quick maths bruv (9 points, 10 comments)
  15. 47 points, 7 submissions: lCyberneticl
    1. What do you all think? Anyone working on logo/graphics/advertising (20 points, 7 comments)
    2. Go NYC! (8 points, 0 comments)
    3. NYC (7 points, 1 comment)
    4. Work in progress! (5 points, 2 comments)
    5. My contribution to the website contest (3 points, 0 comments)
    6. Just an idea (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. NYC (2 points, 1 comment)
  16. 40 points, 1 submission: RealWorldCoins
    1. BREAKING NEWS! CNBC producer was at KEATS restaurant to video the first ever retail transaction using cryptocurrency, NY Coin.....This story is still developing and air date has not been disclosed. NY Coin is supposedly 20x faster than Bitcoin and does not have any fees. (40 points, 20 comments)
  17. 39 points, 5 submissions: NYC_NewYorkCoin
    1. If anyone can contact this place La Sirene in Manhattan, Im sure they will place the NYC sticker up (14 points, 6 comments)
    2. NYC New York Coin is now actively trading on Tradesatoshi.com Congrat's all. (8 points, 2 comments)
    3. NYC New York Coin This must be the coin!! (7 points, 0 comments)
    4. Picked up some more NYCoin! Lets Hope for the Best! NYC Coin 20X faster than Bitcoin NYC is simply more usable than Bitcoin. NYC is 20X faster to send, receive & confirm transactions. And 5X faster than Litecoin. NYC is much cheaper to use than Bitcoin or Litecoin. Actually, it's free! (7 points, 4 comments)
    5. New York Coin ,New York Coin, Start spreading the news You're leaving today Your vagabond shoes, they are longing to stray And steps around the heart of it, New York, New York -New York Frank Sinatra (3 points, 1 comment)
  18. 36 points, 4 submissions: nicovs_be
    1. ElectrumX and Electrum-NYC wallet by the newyorkcoin community (14 points, 0 comments)
    2. There's the 1st 2SAT NYC sells ever (11 points, 1 comment)
    3. KEATSBAR confirmation is now on the site (7 points, 5 comments)
    4. NYCoin Core Wallet Block data Download (Data up to date up to Jan 7th 9PM) (4 points, 5 comments)
  19. 35 points, 4 submissions: TweeknTekneek
    1. I bought in newyorkcoin !!! (15 points, 34 comments)
    2. I hope one day NYC coins are soo common, that they become the new digital coin for parking meters! (10 points, 0 comments)
    3. If and when NYC hits $0.01 - $0.10 (5 points, 8 comments)
    4. What is the best Walter for NYC? (5 points, 3 comments)
  20. 34 points, 5 submissions: fionaman
    1. Binance is Possible... (16 points, 7 comments)
    2. Will NYC make us millionaires? (8 points, 8 comments)
    3. We should try to get NYC on Coin Exchange (5 points, 2 comments)
    4. Lescovex vote - NYC #3 & "under consideration (3 points, 3 comments)
    5. Why is the total supply increasing? (2 points, 5 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. hivewalletvictim (611 points, 343 comments)
  2. Tnyc2477 (367 points, 171 comments)
  3. nodecache (340 points, 131 comments)
  4. dwilkes827 (168 points, 75 comments)
  5. nicovs_be (166 points, 74 comments)
  6. cryptonyxx (153 points, 62 comments)
  7. mariusadrian2103 (132 points, 42 comments)
  8. JohnSewards (122 points, 53 comments)
  9. zer0san (118 points, 48 comments)
  10. GiorgosK (110 points, 104 comments)
  11. kuch167 (102 points, 37 comments)
  12. jamesburrell2 (99 points, 39 comments)
  13. polkaberries (92 points, 47 comments)
  14. CoinmaticNYC (92 points, 32 comments)
  15. yarikd (90 points, 45 comments)
  16. GU1TARW0RLD- (69 points, 42 comments)
  17. kyguy17 (57 points, 21 comments)
  18. dynamicmormon (54 points, 30 comments)
  19. NewyorkCoinFrance (53 points, 21 comments)
  20. TweeknTekneek (52 points, 32 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. BREAKING NEWS! CNBC producer was at KEATS restaurant to video the first ever retail transaction using cryptocurrency, NY Coin.....This story is still developing and air date has not been disclosed. NY Coin is supposedly 20x faster than Bitcoin and does not have any fees. by RealWorldCoins (40 points, 20 comments)
  2. Wall Street Journal article about NewYorkCoin by jamesburrell2 (35 points, 25 comments)
  3. Welcome Pro Snowboarder Jeff Sponzo to TEAM NYC! NewYorkCoin (NYC) has sponsored professional snowboarder Jeff Sponzo (instagram: @sp0nzo) Wish Jeff luck! He's competing in Oslo, Norway and spreading the word about NYC on his world tour!!! by hivewalletvictim (33 points, 6 comments)
  4. An exhaustive email explaining NYC "roadmap" to the 'hype and scam' crowd. PLEASE READ. by hivewalletvictim (31 points, 59 comments)
  5. Good job Newyorkcoin Team very interesting by modoromodo (28 points, 0 comments)
  6. 1,000,000 NYC BOUNTIES for every new retail/storefront business YOU get to accept NewYorkCoin in New York City. Business owner downloads Coinomi Wallet (beta) from link at newyorkcoin.net and prints their QR code for customers to pay! Business owner receives 1,000,000 NYC too! by hivewalletvictim (27 points, 11 comments)
  7. Who is applying and sending in the info the exchanges require to get added ? Ill do it and pay the fees they require if someone will give me permission and materials I request. I’ll pay the fees as well they range $5000 to 20,000. Exchanges want money it’s that simple. by earthfunds (26 points, 10 comments)
  8. Logo Idea by shotxchance (25 points, 18 comments)
  9. LEASE NEGOTIATIONS IN PROCESS FOR AN AMAZING GALLERY SPACE IN LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN! THE NEW YORK COIN CENTER WILL BE OPENING SOON IN MANHATTAN. by hivewalletvictim (24 points, 18 comments)
  10. Gila's Nosh | 23rd Street NOW ACCEPTS NYC! by hivewalletvictim (24 points, 7 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 14 points: deleted's comment in LEASE NEGOTIATIONS IN PROCESS FOR AN AMAZING GALLERY SPACE IN LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN! THE NEW YORK COIN CENTER WILL BE OPENING SOON IN MANHATTAN.
  2. 12 points: hivewalletvictim's comment in An exhaustive email explaining NYC "roadmap" to the 'hype and scam' crowd. PLEASE READ.
  3. 12 points: yarikd's comment in dkbigmoney = Charlie K
  4. 11 points: zer0san's comment in Reddit Banner & Marketing
  5. 10 points: deleted's comment in I dreamt that NYC coin becomes #1 last night.
  6. 10 points: deleted's comment in LEASE NEGOTIATIONS IN PROCESS FOR AN AMAZING GALLERY SPACE IN LOWER EAST SIDE, MANHATTAN! THE NEW YORK COIN CENTER WILL BE OPENING SOON IN MANHATTAN.
  7. 10 points: bshaw2019's comment in Please release regular wallet updates and show that you are actually doing SOMETHING in terms of development.
  8. 10 points: jamesburrell2's comment in Wall Street Journal article about NewYorkCoin
  9. 10 points: nodecache's comment in Web page
  10. 9 points: 3mar7's comment in In an unbiased and honest opinion, what do you guys see this coin reaching in 1-2 years?
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